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What finally worked was:

        a <- cast(we, year ~ region, mean, value='response') 

Although, I only have 1 observation per region and site, so mean is just a workaround. I couldn't get c to work as a function.

  • Output for suggested answer (by Justin)

        > DT
        > response year
        > 1:      15 2000
        > 2:       6 2000
        > 3:      23 2000
        > 4:      23 2000
         ---             
        > 794:       3 2010
        > 795:       5 2010
        > 796:       1 2010
    
  • Update: desired output should look like:

       > Year   x1  x2  x3   x4
       > 2000   4   5   16   22
       > 2001   6   11   2   18
       > 2002   1   0   21   10
       > ...
    

I am struggling to find a way to transpose my data based on factor levels. I have data with 2 columns, a factor and a response. I have many rows for each factor, so I want to transpose the table such that each factor is on one row, with the different responses as a column in that row. I cannot seem to subset within a loop based on levels of that factor. I would appreciate any insight.

example of data:

          > response    year
          > 5           2001
          > 10          2001
          > 8           2001
          > 1           2002
          > 7           2010

  > levels(data$year)
  [1] "2000" "2001" "2002" "2003" "2004" "2005" ...
  w <- matrix(0,54,15)

  for(i in 1:levels(data$year)){
    w[i] <- levels(data$year)==i
  }

This syntax is obviously not correct, but it is the idea of what I'm trying to accomplish.

Thank you.

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Jilber, Michael Kohne, Phil Hannent, chrylis, David Oct 3 '13 at 14:24

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Can you include your desired output. I don't fully understand what you're trying to do. –  Justin Sep 25 '13 at 17:32
    
Yes, I want a row for each year (factor level) with the responses in that row: I'll provide example above in question. –  user.bayes Sep 25 '13 at 17:35
    
It's still unclear even though you have an example because there's no way of knowing what goes in what column. What are x1, x2, etc.? In a row, are the additional columns the actual response and the entries the counts of the response in that cell? Or, are the x1, etc. columns an additional factor besides year and the responses are just the actual response. –  John Sep 25 '13 at 18:08
    
Please refrain from changing your question and instead add to it for clarification. –  Justin Sep 25 '13 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

Using the data.table package this is trivial:

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(data)
DT[, as.list(value), by=year]

However, this will fall apart if you have different numbers of observations per year. Instead:

DT[, list(values = list(value)), by=year]

Or using base R:

tapply(data$value, data$year, c)
share|improve this answer
    
That seemed to work, but it doesn't give me a consolidated data table it seems to give me a split of rows by year as opposed to columns with values by year all in one row. Maybe I'm missing a step? I'll post the output above. –  user.bayes Sep 25 '13 at 17:48
    
The first version will give you columns. But that plan can only work if you have an equal number of samples in each year. Otherwise, the list like version returned from tapply will be a much better option. –  Justin Sep 25 '13 at 17:49
    
As an alternative to tapply you can also use with(data, split(value, year)) –  Jilber Sep 25 '13 at 17:51
    
Yes, I think the tapply will work, but it puts all values into one list. I guess I can just separate based on columns into individual columns. I'll work with that. Thank you. –  user.bayes Sep 25 '13 at 17:55
1  
as.data.frame(with(data, split(value, year))) but again, if you have different numbers of observations this won't work. –  Justin Sep 25 '13 at 18:16

Here's another way, using aggregate:

> set.seed(1)
> data <- data.frame(year = rep(2000:2010, each=10), value = sample(3:30, 110, TRUE))
> aggregate(value~year, data=data, FUN=c)
   year value.1 value.2 value.3 value.4 value.5 value.6 value.7 value.8 value.9 value.10
1  2000      10      13      19      28       8      28      29      21      20        4
2  2001       8       7      22      13      24      16      23      30      13       24
3  2002      29       8      21       6      10      13       3      13      27       12
4  2003      16      19      16       8      26      21      25       6      23       14
5  2004      25      21      24      18      17      25       3      16      23       22
6  2005      16      27      15       9       4       5      11      17      21       14
7  2006      28      11      15      12      21      10      16      24       5       27
8  2007      12      26      12      12      16      27      27      13      24       29
9  2008      15      22      14      12      24       8      22       6       9        7
10 2009       9       4      20      27      24      25      15      14      25       19
11 2010      21      12      10      30      20       8       6      16      28       19
share|improve this answer
    
That looks like it might be what's being asked for. –  John Sep 26 '13 at 1:42
    
This looks exactly like what I need, but for some reason I am getting the following error: Error in get(as.character(FUN), mode = "function", envir = envir) : object 'FUN' of mode 'function' was not found –  user.bayes Sep 26 '13 at 14:52
    
You are getting this error because (maybe) you have an object named c in your environment, so you have overwritten the function c and that's why the error is appearing. There are two solutions: 1) delete the c object you have in your session or 2) provide the environment where the c function is contained: aggregate(value~year, data=data, FUN=base::c) I prefer the last one :D –  Jilber Sep 26 '13 at 15:00
    
Ah, yes. However, I stil get a resulting data frame with 2 columns - one with my values as a comma separated list. It doesn't look like your output above. –  user.bayes Sep 26 '13 at 16:23
    
I used simulated values, so on my example the code runs ok, maybe your data dont look like the ones in my example. Also note that the quality of the answers depends on the quality of your question, if none of the answers solve your problem then try to take one moment and write a good question with samle of data, what have you tried and the expected result, please be clear. –  Jilber Sep 26 '13 at 16:44

If I had a different number of responses per year, I would probably come at this problem by first making a new variable to represent the response in each year and then casting that dataset out using dcast. By default dcast fills in missing values with NA, although you can change that if needed.

set.seed(1)
data = data.frame(year = c(rep(2000:2010, each=10), 2011), value = sample(3:30, 111, TRUE))

require(reshape2)
require(plyr)
# Create a new variable representing the number of responses per year and add to dataset
dat2 = ddply(data, .(year), transform, 
              response = interaction("x", 1:length(value), sep = ""))

dcast(dat2, year ~ response, value.var = "value")
share|improve this answer
    
I think the variable number of responses per year is a problem for this. –  user.bayes Sep 26 '13 at 16:33
    
My example does have a variable number of responses per year. That's the reason I put this up. I could see a problem if you have, say, responses 1-4 in one year and responses 2-5 in another year. I'm not sure how you'd deal with that. –  aosmith Sep 27 '13 at 0:37

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