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Hi I'm making a progress bar with arrow as dividers, something like this:

HTML

<ul>
    <li>
        step 1
        <span class="arrow"></span>
    </li>
    <li>
        step 2
        <span class="arrow"></span>
    </li>
    <li>
        step 3
    </li>
</ul>

CSS

li{
    float: left;
    width: 25%;
    background-color: #4a4a4a;
    color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
    padding: 10px 0;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 100;
}
.arrow{
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-top: 30px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 30px solid transparent;
    border-left: 30px solid red;
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    right: -30px;
    top: 0px;
    z-index: 200;
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/pleasedontbelong/kGmg5/

But the arrows are always behind the li elements. Am I missing something? Is it possible to do this without changing the html?

share|improve this question
2  
remove the z-index on the li and it will work. Not sure why you need to push the arrows to the right, it should work without the -30, right: 0 should be fine. Then again maybe your setup is different than I think it is –  Huangism Sep 25 '13 at 18:15
1  
The problem lies in your right: -30px; which is essentialls pushing the arrow to the right and behind the next LI which has a different stacking context. –  j08691 Sep 25 '13 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you give an element a z-index, you create a stacking context for it. All other z-indexes on it's children will only take effect on that stacking context.

In your example, when you give your li's a z-index, you're creating a different stacking context for each of them. The arrows with the z-index will only be able to be able to get above other elements that belong to the same parent li's stacking context.

I hope I've made myself clear. But even if I did, checkout https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/CSS/Understanding_z_index/The_stacking_context . It's got some good examples.

Without changing the html, you can, as Sunil Salunkhe suggested, remove the z-index on the li's. From what it appears, there's no reason for it to be there anyway.

share|improve this answer

You need to remove z-index on li:

li
{
    float: left;
    width: 25%;
    background-color: #4a4a4a;
    color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
    padding: 10px 0;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 100;
}
share|improve this answer

@Huangism is correct, the change that fixed the problem was the z-index on the li.

http://jsfiddle.net/kGmg5/9/

li{
    float: left;
    width: 25%;
    background-color: #4a4a4a;
    color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
    padding: 10px 0;
    position: relative;
    /* z-index:200;  Removed */
}

From his comment:

The right -30 is pushing the arrows behind the next li and with the z-index on the li, it creates a different stacking order

share|improve this answer
    
without the content it works as well, mainly due to the fact you removed the z-index on the li –  Huangism Sep 25 '13 at 18:17
    
You are correct. You should answer this post to take credit, sir. –  jbaum012 Sep 25 '13 at 18:19
    
I am at work, you should just update your answer. The right -30 is pushing the arrows behind the next li and with the z-index on the li, it creates a different stacking order –  Huangism Sep 25 '13 at 18:21

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