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I just tried write small program in C++ Builder 6(don't ask me why, its just a homework in institute). So, my program must hide button1 when i resizing form. But resize event raises after window created, its mean that after i start program button1 is already invisible.

void __fastcall TForm1::FormResize(TObject *Sender)
{
  Button1->Visible = false;
}

I tried use different resize events, but it don't works too. What I'm doing wrong?

PS. Sorry for my bad English.

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In your tool for creating the forms, verify the default value of the button. You may want to set it to disabled. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 25 '13 at 19:17
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1 Answer

There is nothing wrong. The Form really does resize while it is being created, that is why you get the event. There are many ways you can address this:

  1. use a variable to ignore the first OnResize event until the form is ready:

    private:
        bool fReady;
    

    void __fastcall TForm1::FormResize(TObject *Sender)
    {
        if (!fReady)
            fReady = true;
        else
            Button1->Visible = false;
    }
    
  2. use the Form's OnShow event to post a custom message to signal the form is ready:

    private:
        bool fReady;
    protected:
        virtual void __fastcall WndProc(TMessage &Message);
    

    const UINT WM_READY = WM_APP + 100;
    
    void __fastcall TForm1::WndProc(TMessage &Message)
    {
        if (Message.Msg == WM_READY)
            fReady = true;
        else
            TForm::WndProc(Message);
    }
    
    void __fastcall TForm1::FormShow(TObject *Sender)
    {
        PostMessage(Handle, WM_READY, 0, 0);
    }
    
    void __fastcall TForm1::FormResize(TObject *Sender)
    {
        if (fReady)
            Button1->Visible = false;
    }
    
  3. use a short timer instead of a custom message:

    private:
        bool fReady;
    

    void __fastcall TForm1::Timer1Timer(TMessage &Message)
    {
        Timer1->Enabled = false;
        fReady = true;
    }
    
    void __fastcall TForm1::FormShow(TObject *Sender)
    {
        Timer1->Enabled = true;
    }
    
    void __fastcall TForm1::FormResize(TObject *Sender)
    {
        if (fReady)
            Button1->Visible = false;
    }
    

Just to name a few.

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Why do you push the message instead of just setting fReady = true; in the FormShow handler? (NB. fReady needs to be initialized to false in the constructor). –  Matt McNabb May 16 at 4:11
1  
The OnShow event is triggered before the Form actually becomes visible onscreen, so the message post is just an added delay to make sure the user sees the window before allowing the button to hide. And the variable is initialized to false by the RTL by virtue of the fact that it is a member of the Form class and all TObject descendants (which TForm1 is) automatically fill their allocated memory with zeros before the constructor is called. –  Remy Lebeau May 16 at 14:31
    
Is that zero-memory behaviour something we should rely on when coding? –  Matt McNabb May 17 at 4:12
1  
It is a feature specific to the Delphi/C++Builder compilers for the TObject class. All TObject-derived classes are auto-initialized with zeros before the constructor is executed. This is not standard C++ behavior, but it is reliable in C++Builder for TObject-derived classes only. –  Remy Lebeau May 17 at 6:54
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