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I have a rudimentary array with elements [0 to N - 1] where each element is a structure that has an index always pointing to a location earlier in the array.

At one point, as part of a much larger algorithm, I want to find a specific C lowest common ancestor between the node X and any nodes after.

int LCA(a, b) {
    while (a != b) {
        if (a > b) {
            a = nodes[a].parent;
        } else {
            b = nodes[b].parent;
        }
    }
    return a;
}

for (y = x + 1; y < n; ++y) {
    if (LCA(x, y) == c) {
        //other code
    }
}

The above code is really pseudo-code. I've managed to slightly improve performance of LCA() by having a look-up table generated as it is used. Something like this:

int LCA(a, b) {
    if (lookup[a, b]) {
        return lookup[a, b];
    }
    oa = a; ob = b;
    while (a != b) {
        if (a > b) {
            a = nodes[a].parent;
        } else {
            b = nodes[b].parent;
        }
    }
    lookup[oa, ob] = a;
    lookup[ob, oa] = a;
    return a;
}

I know there's likely a way I can make some sort of specialized LCA() function, that is, replace all of the above code in some manner to specialize it so it's considerably faster. But I've not thought of anything interesting.

I've attempted to see if I could simply do an LCA check between C and Y by seeing if LCA(c, y) == LCA(x, y), but of course that was not accurate.

To re-cap: X is always less than Y. C is always less than X (and thus Y). Parents are always at a lower index than their children (so it is ordered).

Would nodes knowing their depth help at all?

This code accounts for 80% of CPU time of the entire algorithm that takes about 4 minutes in total. A solution to this would easily improve the algorithm as a whole. Thanks!

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Belongs on Code Review or maybe Computer Science –  millimoose Sep 25 '13 at 20:57
    
Also, honestly, my gut tells me that's as good as you'll get - it's already sublinear time. I'm surprised that the lookup table didn't help much, this does seem like a prime candidate for memoization. The one thing that could take this below linear time would be building the lookup table as you insert elements into this data structure, but that'd potentially take O(n^2) memory overhead, make insertion a lot slower, and seems like it wouldn't be trivial to do. (Assuming by "lookup table" you mean "hashtable". If you don't, I'd use one.) –  millimoose Sep 25 '13 at 20:59
    
Memoization will not necessarily help, it depends on what queries you get really. You should use a more efficient LCA algorithm. It's possible to answer a query in O(1) with some preprocessing. –  IVlad Sep 25 '13 at 21:02
    
Any suggestions on pre-processing? I'm not using a hashtable - using a 2D array. –  PhoenixX_2 Sep 25 '13 at 21:03
    
Would you explain how your look-up table helps? –  ArjunShankar Sep 25 '13 at 21:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The LCA of x and y will be the node with smallest height between an occurrence of x and an occurrence of y in the euler tour (*) of your tree. To find this in O(1) time, you need to solve the RMQ problem using this method.

(*): your tour needs a slight modification for this to work. You must append a value to your array each time you get back to it (return from a recursive call to a child) as well. For the wiki tree, it would look like this:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 2 6 2 4 2 1 3 1 5  1

Note that there's no point to have leafs show up twice (although it wouldn't affect correctness).

So, for example, RMQ(2, 5) will be the node with minimum height out of these:

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
2 6 2 4 2 1 3 1 5 

Which is node 1.

That is not the only valid interval you can take. It's also valid to take the last occurrence of 2:

6 7 8 9 10
2 1 3 1 5 

This will also return 1 as the LCA.

This way, you can answer LCA queries in constant time with linear time spent on preprocessing.

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