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Suppose that I want to pass a function to another function via f1(f2(k, g, x), other, junk) (f1 is defined as f1(func, other, junk) and it involves expressions like func(other).) Further suppose that both of these functions are contained in a third function f3(k, g). By calling f3(k, g) with some values of k and g, f2 isn't really a function of three variables anymore, is it? It's only a function of x since k and g are now constants. So what I want to know is whether or not there's somehow a way of saying "look, f2, you didn't know what k and g were when I defined you, but now you do since I told f3 what they were, so you can just consider yourself as a function of x, so when I pass you to f1, it sees and uses a function of only one variable."

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fortran != mathematica.. –  agentp Sep 26 '13 at 15:15
    
Thank you @george for this helpful and insightful comment. I immediately realized what the problem was and corrected it. In fact, I've e-mailed the moderators requesting a new feature which allows me to award bounties to comments. –  Mr. G Nov 2 '13 at 18:56

2 Answers 2

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What I think you are looking for is sometimes called a "functor/function object" or lambda expression - the ability to wrap a procedure with a number of arguments up in a way that it can be called with fewer arguments (the missing arguments being specified via other means).

In Fortran 77 this was typically approximated by passing the "missing" arguments through behind the scenes in a common block. Fortran 90/95's varied that by letting you use module variables. Both these approaches have the downside that only a single instance of the wrapped procedure can be extant at the one time, though the use of modules over common blocks is a vastly superior option for other reasons.

Fortran 2003 introduces other options - using derived types and type extension. This requires changes to the code of f1 - instead of having a dummy procedure argument the function takes a polymorphic argument, the declared type of which has a binding that has the interface similar to the former argument of f1 but with a passed object. The missing arguments then become components in extensions of that declared type. This approach brings with it a vast increase in flexibility and capability, not the least of which is that multiple instances of the wrapped procedure can then be extant at any one time, at the cost of some verbosity.

Fortran 2008 introduces another option using internal procedures, with the missing arguments passed via host association from a host procedure to the internal procedure. (This approach was not available in previous standards because internal procedures were not permitted to be passed as actual procedure arguments). Multiple instances of the wrapped procedure can be extant through the use of procedure pointers.

Examples for the four different approaches attached. Note that the other and junk entities have not been declared in any of the examples of the F3 procedure, and there may be some other omissions (or what I would consider very poor programming style) for the sake of the example. Further, note that the four approaches differ greatly in terms of the flexibility and robustness of the code (likelihood that programmer error being caught, etc).

C*******************************************************************************
C FORTRAN 77
      FUNCTION F1(FUNC,OTHER,JUNK)
        F1=FUNC(OTHER)+JUNK
      END FUNCTION F1
C
      FUNCTION F2(K,G,X)
        F2=K+G+X
      END FUNCTION F2
C
      FUNCTION F3(K,G)
        COMMON /F2COM/KC,GC
        KC=K
        GC=G
        F3=F1(F2WRAP,OTHER,JUNK)
      END FUNCTION F3
C
      FUNCTION F2WRAP(X)
        COMMON /F2COM/KC,GC
        F2WRAP=F2(KC,GC,X)
      END FUNCTION F2WRAP


!*******************************************************************************
! Fortran 90/95
MODULE m1990
  IMPLICIT NONE
  INTEGER :: km
  REAL :: gm
CONTAINS
  FUNCTION F2Wrap(x)
    REAL :: x
    !****
    ! F2 unchanged from F77, though good practice would be to make 
    ! it (and F1 and F3) module procedures.
    ! ensure it had an explicit interface here.
    F2Wrap = F2(km,gm,x)
  END FUNCTION F2Wrap
END MODULE m1990

FUNCTION F3(k,g)
  USE m1990
  IMPLICIT NONE
  INTEGER :: k
  REAL :: g, F3
  !****
  km = k
  gm = g
  ! F1 unchanged from F77.
  F3=F1(F2Wrap, other, junk)
END FUNCTION F3


!*******************************************************************************
! Fortran 2003
MODULE m2003
  IMPLICIT NONE
  TYPE Functor
  CONTAINS
    PROCEDURE(fun_intf), DEFERRED :: fun
  END TYPE Functor

  ABSTRACT INTERFACE
    FUNCTION fun_intf(f,x)
      IMPLICIT NONE
      IMPORT :: Functor
      CLASS(Functor), INTENT(IN) :: f
      REAL :: x, fun_intf
    END FUNCTION fun_intf
  END INTERFACE

  TYPE F2Functor
    INTEGER :: k
    REAL : g
  CONTAINS
    PROCEDURE :: fun => F2_wrap
  END TYPE F2Functor
CONTAINS
  FUNCTION F2_wrap(f,x)
    CLASS(F2Functor), INTENT(IN) :: f
    REAL :: F2_wrap, x
    ! F2 unchanged from F77
    F2_wrap = F2(f%k, f%g, x)
  END FUNCTION f2_wrap

  ! F1 modified.  Now takes a polymorphic argument in-place of the 
  ! dummy procedure - explicit interface REQUIRED.
  FUNCTION F1(f, other, junk)
    CLASS(Functor), INTENT(IN) :: f
    REAL :: F1, other
    INTEGER :: junk
    F1 = f%fun(other) + junk
  END FUNCTION 
END MODULE m2003

! Good practice would make this a module procedure.
FUNCTION f3(k,g)
  USE m2003
  IMPLICIT NONE
  TYPE(F2Functor) :: f
  REAL F3, g
  INTEGER :: k
  !****
  f%k = k
  f%g = g
  F3 = F1(f, other, junk)
END FUNCTION f3


!*******************************************************************************
! Fortran 2008 (use of procedure pointers not illustrated).

! Should be a module proc, etc...
FUNCTION F3(k,g)
  REAL :: F3, g
  INTEGER :: k
  INTEGER :: k_host
  REAL :: g_host
  k_host = k
  g_host = g
  ! F1 unchanged from F77 (though good practice is..., etc) 
  F3 = F1(F2Wrap, other, junk)
CONTAINS
  FUNCTION F2Wrap(x)
    REAL :: x, F2Wrap
    ! F2 unchanged from F77.
    F2Wrap = F2(k_host, g_host, x)
  END FUNCTION F2Wrap
END FUNCTION F3
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The problem of functors from internal procedures is thet the are illegal to reference as soon as their host procedure terminates. –  Vladimir F Sep 26 '13 at 6:35
    
Fair point. Sans SAVE attribute that also potentially applies to the F77 or F90/95 approach (under those standards) too. –  IanH Sep 26 '13 at 7:10

Supposing that I am interpreting this correctly, then yes.

program func_test
   integer :: a, b
   a = 4
   b = 3
   print *,f3(a,b)
   print *,f3(b,a)
 contains
   function f3(k,g)
      integer :: k, g, x, f3
      x = 2
      f3 = f1(f2(k,g,x), 3, 13)
   end function f3

   function f2(k, g, x)
      integer :: k, g, x, f2
      f2 = k+g*x
   end function f2

   function f1(func, other, junk)
      integer :: func, other, junk
      f1 = func + other*junk
   end function f1
end program func_test

Unless I am mistaken, f2(k,g,x) in this example will be evaluated and then sent to f1 as an integer. If you wanted f2 to be called from f1, then you would also have to pass the arguments k, g, and x from f3 to f1.

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