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Possible Duplicate:
C#: Is using Random and OrderBy a good shuffle algorithm?

I want to create an extension method which should shuffle the items in the collection.

Can i improve the following?

public static IList<T> RandomList<T>(this IList<T> source)
{
   if (source.Count <= 0) throw new ArgumentException("No Item to Randomize");  

            for (int i =source.Count-1 ; i>0; i--)
            {
                int RandomIndex = Rnd.Next(i + 1);
                T temp = source[i];
                source[i] = source[RandomIndex];
                source[RandomIndex] = temp;
            }

            return source;
 }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by jason, Winston Smith, Hans Passant, jitter, Graviton Dec 16 '09 at 7:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Yes, see stackoverflow.com/questions/1287567/… – jason Dec 14 '09 at 15:36
    
That does NOT qualify as an exact duplicate. – C. Ross Dec 14 '09 at 15:42
    
@C. Ross: Look at Jon's answer. It answers the question. – jason Dec 14 '09 at 15:52
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few issues I would have with this method:

  • It should check for a null argument.
  • It should not check for a 0-length list.
  • Avoid side-effects. Create a new list for the shuffled elements, instead of modifying the existing one.
  • Don't hide dependencies. Pass the random number generator in as an argument.
  • Use a more descriptive name than 'RandomList'.
  • The input type can be generalized to IEnumerable.
  • The method can be changed to an enumerator [generalize the output type].

Essentially:

public static IList<T> Shuffled<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Random generator)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (generator == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("generator");

    //copy
    var result = source.ToList();
    //shuffle the copy
    for (int i = result.Count - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        int RandomIndex = generator.Next(i + 1);
        T temp = result[i];
        result[i] = result[RandomIndex];
        result[RandomIndex] = temp;
    }

    return result;
}

I didn't generalize the output type. You can do that if you want.

share|improve this answer
public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
   foreach(var item in source.OrderBy(i => Guid.NewGuid()))
   {
      yield return item;
   }
}
share|improve this answer

I think is good enough as long as you know Random is not very random.

the Random class is viable for use in simple games and other non-scientific fields. Do not use it for cryptography.

share|improve this answer
    
Random is for (almost) all intents and purposes random. – jason Dec 14 '09 at 16:14
    
Better safe than sorry. – Jorge Córdoba Dec 14 '09 at 16:27

Generally you should avoid changing the list and instead return a new list. Even better would be to return IEnumerable to be consistent with other Extension methods and LINQ.

Try this.

public static class RandomizeExtensionMethods
{
	private static readonly Random _random = new Random();

	public static IEnumerable<T> Randomize<T>(this IList<T> enumerable)
	{
		if (enumerable == null || enumerable.Count == 0)
		{
			return new List<T>(0);
		}

		return RandomizeImpl(enumerable);			
	}

	public static IEnumerable<T> RandomizeImpl<T>(this IList<T> enumerable)
	{
		var indices = new int[enumerable.Count];
		for(int i=0; i<indices.Length; i++)
		{
			indices[i] = i;
		}

		lock (_random)
		{
			for (int i = 0; i < indices.Length - 1; i++)
			{
				int j = _random.Next(i, indices.Length);
				int swap = indices[j];
				indices[j] = indices[i];
				indices[i] = swap;
			}
		}

		for(int i=0; i<indices.Length; i++)
		{
			yield return enumerable[indices[i]];
		}
	}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice implementation @Sam. I like the forethought to swap the indicies instead of the elements themselves in case the elements are expensive to copy. – Martin Neal Jun 9 '10 at 1:36

Having it return itself is somewhat redundant. If you were returning a deep copy of the list, sure; and in that case it should get called "GetShuffledCopy()" or something similar. If you're acting on the list itself, it should be a void return and be called something like "Shuffle()"

-Oisin

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