Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In numpy, I would like to be able to input n for rows and m for columns and end with the array that looks like:

[(0,0,0,0),
 (1,1,1,1),
 (2,2,2,2)]

So that would be a 3x4. Each column is just a copy of the previous one and the row increases by one each time. As an example: input would be 4, then 6 and the output would be and array

[(0,0,0,0,0,0),
 (1,1,1,1,1,1),
 (2,2,2,2,2,2),
 (3,3,3,3,3,3)]

4 rows and 6 columns where the row increases by one each time. Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question
1  
you mean 3 in the last row of your second array right? – prgao Sep 25 '13 at 23:25
1  
What are you going to do with this array? You might be able to avoid creating such an array if the subsequent operations can use numpy's broadcasting ability. – Warren Weckesser Sep 26 '13 at 0:32

So many possibilities...

In [51]: n = 4

In [52]: m = 6

In [53]: np.tile(np.arange(n), (m, 1)).T
Out[53]: 
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]])

In [54]: np.repeat(np.arange(n).reshape(-1,1), m, axis=1)
Out[54]: 
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]])

In [55]: np.outer(np.arange(n), np.ones(m, dtype=int))
Out[55]: 
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]])

Here's one more. The neat trick here is that the values are not duplicated--only memory for the single sequence [0, 1, 2, ..., n-1] is allocated.

In [67]: from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided

In [68]: seq = np.arange(n)

In [69]: rep = as_strided(seq, shape=(n,m), strides=(seq.strides[0],0))

In [70]: rep
Out[70]: 
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]])

Be careful with the as_strided function. If you don't get the arguments right, you can crash Python.

To see that seq has not been copied, change seq in place, and then check rep:

In [71]: seq[1] = 99

In [72]: rep
Out[72]: 
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
       [99, 99, 99, 99, 99, 99],
       [ 2,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  3]])
share|improve this answer
    
Slick. I hadn't noticed that you already showed how to use as_strided. – IanH Sep 26 '13 at 1:00
import numpy as np

def foo(n, m):
    return np.array([np.arange(n)] * m).T
share|improve this answer

Natively (no Python lists):

rows, columns = 4, 6
numpy.arange(rows).reshape(-1, 1).repeat(columns, axis=1)
#>>> array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#>>>        [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
#>>>        [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
#>>>        [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]])
share|improve this answer

You can easily do this using built in python functions. The program counts to 3 converting each number to a string and repeats the string 6 times.

print [6*str(n) for n in range(0,4)]

Here is the output.

ks-MacBook-Pro:~ kyle$ pbpaste | python
['000000', '111111', '222222', '333333']
share|improve this answer
2  
user2785334 asked for a matrix of numbers, not characters. Furthermore, user2785334 wants to do it with a Numpy array. – Veedrac Sep 25 '13 at 23:52

On more for fun

np.zeros((n, m), dtype=np.int) + np.arange(n, dtype=np.int)[:,None]
share|improve this answer
1  
Slight variation: (np.zeros((m,n), dtype=int) + np.arange(n)).T – Warren Weckesser Sep 26 '13 at 0:35

As has been mentioned, there are many ways to do this. Here's what I'd do:

import numpy as np
def makearray(m, n):
    A = np.empty((m,n))
    A.T[:] = np.arange(m)
    return A

Here's an amusing alternative that will work if you aren't going to be changing the contents of the array. It should save some memory. Be careful though because this doesn't allocate a full array, it will have multiple entries pointing to the same memory address.

import numpy as np
from numpy.lib.stride_tricks import as_strided
def makearray(m, n):
    A = np.arange(m)
    return as_strided(A, strides=(A.strides[0],0), shape=(m,n))

In either case, as I have written them, a 3x4 array can be created by makearray(3, 4)

share|improve this answer

Using count from the built-in module itertools:

>>> from itertools import count
>>> rows = 4
>>> columns = 6
>>> cnt = count()
>>> [[cnt.next()]*columns for i in range(rows)]
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]]
share|improve this answer

you can simply

>>> nc=5
>>> nr=4
>>> [[k]*nc for k in range(nr)]
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 2, 2, 2], [3, 3, 3, 3, 3]]
share|improve this answer

Several other possibilities using a (n,1) array

a = np.arange(n)[:,None]  (or np.arange(n).reshape(-1,1))

a*np.ones((m),dtype=int)

a[:,np.zeros((m),dtype=int)]

If used with a (m,) array, just leave it (n,1), and let broadcasting expand it for you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.