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I am working with these two structures, the first holds the employee information while the second holds the list information:

typedef struct ListNodeTag{
  int idNumber;
  struct ListNodeTag *next;
} Employee;

typedef Employee Item;

typedef struct {
  int size;
  Item *head;
} List;

I have this function called Peek in which I send a position, the head of the list, and a pointer to an element apart of Employee.

void Peek (int position, List *L, Item *X) {

  int i;
  Item *currentPtr;

  currentPtr = L->head;

  for(i = 0; i < position; i++){
    if(currentPtr->next == NULL){
      X = currentPtr;
      break;
    }
    currentPtr = currentPtr->next;
  }

  X = currentPtr;

}

I call the function Peek from main in this loop.

  for(i=0;i<Length(&L);i++){
    Peek(i,&L,&S);
    printf("    %d%\n",idNumber);
  }

It's purpose is to print off each member of the list with the Employee ID on a new line. The first member of the list however, when the second is called, a seg-fault occurs at the line currentPtr = currentPtr->next;

The data in my list is populated from this insert function:

void Insert (Item X, int position, List *L) {
  int i;
  Item *currentPtr,*previousPtr;
  Item *temp = malloc(sizeof(Item));

  temp->idNumber = X.idNumber;
  temp->next = NULL;

  previousPtr = NULL;

  if(L->head == NULL){
     L->head = temp;
  }

  else{
    currentPtr = L->head;
    for(i=0;i<=position && currentPtr!=NULL;i++){
      previousPtr = currentPtr;
      currentPtr = currentPtr->next;
    }
    temp->next = currentPtr;
    previousPtr->next = temp;
  }
  L->size +=1;
 }

Upon printing, I am able to get results without a segfault however, it is the same entry repeated for however long the list is. EG: for a length of 3 I get:

10925
10925
10925
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You have a for loop going to each next position. But you aren't checking to see if you hit a next which is NULL. There's a lot of code missing here, though, so it's hard to tell how you've populated your data. –  lurker Sep 26 '13 at 0:45
    
I have added my insert function for more detail. If it hits NULL then I suppose it should automatically abort to avoid a seg-fault? –  user2225940 Sep 26 '13 at 0:49
    
How would it "automatically" abort? If it references a NULL as the next pointer, it will segfault. So imagine the case where on a loop iteration, the value of currentPtr->next is NULL. Then the next value of currentPtr becomes NULL by the assignment. Then next time through the loop you attempt, essentially, NULL->next which will segfault. –  lurker Sep 26 '13 at 0:50
    
Oh! I added an if statement if(currentPtr->next == NULL){break;} however it seg-faults too. Could the error lie in the way my next pointers are being set? –  user2225940 Sep 26 '13 at 0:53
    
I think you need to show your updated code. I'm not sure where you put that if. But something similar may be happening somewhere else. When you are using pointers in C, you have to think through their use very carefully to make sure they're set to what you want when you want them. –  lurker Sep 26 '13 at 0:58
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1 Answer

There are at least two problems with this code.


The first problem is with your Peek function. Look at the last line:

X = currentPtr;

Recall that C is a call by value language, which means that this line only changes Peek's local value of X, which is simply discarded when Peek returns; main never sees it.

You need to change Peek to be something like

void Peek (int position, List *L, Item **X) {

and then the last line of Peek should be changed to

*X = currentPtr;

Accordingly, you need to change the value that is passed as X by main into Peek. You didn't say how you declared S inside your main function, but I presume it is currently of the form:

Item *S;

You then need to change it to

Item *S[1];

The Peek call can be left alone as

Peek(i,&L,&S);

After these changes, main will declare an array S of length 1 of Item pointers, and will pass the address of S to Peek. The last line of Peek then stores currentPtr at the address pointed to by its value of X, writing over the first Item pointer in the array S.


The second problem is with the for loop:

for(i=0;i<Length(&L);i++){
  Peek(i,&L,&S);
  printf("    %d%\n",idNumber);
}

Why do you expect the printf to print different things on each iteration of the loop? idNumber is not being changed at all in the loop! With the (fixed) version of Peek, the only thing being changed is the first element of the array S, so you need something like printf("%d\n", S[0]->idNumber);.


You also should remove X = currentPtr; from your loop in Peek,

if(currentPtr->next == NULL){
  X = currentPtr;
  break;
}

as it is redundant; the exact same line (in the unmodified Peek) is run immediately after the break statement.

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