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I was wondering if there is a vectorized way of returning the following:

I have a vector =

x = c(-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,-1,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12)

I want to get a vector of the same length back such that when its crossed above 5 it will set it to 1 (TRUE) until it drops below 0 (FALSE). I am currently doing a for loop which will take forever should the above series have large number of observations.

answer should return:

results = c(0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1)

Any ideas?

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6 Answers 6

With package zoo, you can use this:

results2 <- na.locf(c(NA,1,0)[(x>=5) + 2*(x<=0) + 1],na.rm=FALSE)

identical(results2, results)
#[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but I'm very leery of using things like x==5 for floats. Or did you mean x>=5 ? –  Carl Witthoft Sep 26 '13 at 13:25
    
One more thing: The OP didn't specify what to do if starting out in an intermediate zone (0<x<5) . Your choice of na.rm=FALSE will put NA in such initial locations, which is what I'd do; if the OP prefers to kill them off, he'll want to change to na.rm=TRUE –  Carl Witthoft Sep 26 '13 at 13:34
    
@CarlWitthoft thanks, I've changed to x>=5 to avoid problems with floats. –  Ferdinand.kraft Sep 26 '13 at 21:59
    
I'm intrigued. Does this work with the more complex data set that was suggested by @thelatemail? And, well, how does it work? –  Andy Clifton Sep 27 '13 at 3:23
1  
@AndyClifton well, why not copy the code and try it out? :-) . How it works: break it down. If you execute the internal c(NA,1,0)[(x>=5) + 2*(x<=0) + 1] it'll start to become obvious. Once you've got that vector of NA , 0 and 1 groups, na.locf replaces all NA with the first non-NA value to the "left." –  Carl Witthoft Sep 27 '13 at 11:51

This is pretty ugly, but it seems to work for even quite complicated scenarios:

entex <- function(x,uplim,lwlim) {

  result <- vector("integer",0)
  upr <- which(x>=uplim)
  lwr <- which(x<=lwlim)

  while(length(upr) > 0) {
    if(min(upr) > max(lwr)) {
      result <- unique(c(result,upr))
      upr <- upr[upr > max(result)]
    } else
    {
      result <- unique(c(result,upr[1]:(min(lwr[lwr>upr[1]])-1)))
      lwr <- lwr[lwr > max(result)]
      upr <- upr[upr > max(result)]
    }
  }
  result
}

To show it works:

plot(x,pch=19,type="o")
abline(h=c(0,5),col="lightblue")
result <- entex(x,5,0)
abline(v=result,col="red")

enter image description here

And with a more complex example of x:

x <- c(-0.6, -0.3, 0.5, 0.6, 3, 4.1, 6.7, 3.7, 7.5, 4.1, 6.8, 4.8, 3.3,
       1.6, 3.1, 2, 1.3, 2.9, 2.8, 1.9, 0, -0.5, -0.6, 0.3, 1.9, 5.1, 6.4)

enter image description here

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I like pretty pictures. :) +1 –  Ananda Mahto Sep 26 '13 at 9:18

You can identify the change points using logical values and looking for the changes of that state:

findChangePoint <- function(y,cp){
  results <- 0*y
  state = 0 
  i = 1
  while (i <= length(y)){
    if((state ==0 ) & (y[i] >max(cp))){
      state = 1
    }
    if ((state == 1) && (y[i] <= min(cp))){
      state = 0
    }
    results[i] = state
    i = i+1
  }
  return(results)
}

Then we can make a function to plot it up:

plotChangePoints <- function(y,cp){
  p.state <- ggplot(data = data.frame(x = seq(1,length(y)),
                                      y=y,
                                      state = findChangePoint(y,cp))) +
    geom_point(aes(x = x,
                   y = y)) +
    geom_point(aes(x = x,
                  y = state),
               color = "red")    
  print(p.state)
  return(p.state)
}

so now when you do this, using the more complex data that was suggested:

y <- c(-0.6, -0.3, 0.5, 0.6, 3, 4.1, 6.7, 3.7, 7.5,
     4.1, 6.8, 4.8, 3.3, 1.6, 3.1, 2, 1.3, 2.9, 2.8, 1.9,
     0, -0.5, -0.6, 0.3, 1.9, 5.1, 6.4)
# specify the change points we will use:
cp=c(5,1)
plotChangePoints(y,cp)

you get this, where the black points are the data and the red is the state (i.e. 'switched' or not)

enter image description here

And, if all you want is the results, use:

results <- findChangePoint(y,cp)
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1  
Have a look at seq - it does what you're trying to do with paste –  Ricardo Saporta Sep 26 '13 at 3:15
    
except that seq() doesn't work with vectors, which is what I have in cp.up and cp.down. Turns out the answer is to use mapply. –  Andy Clifton Sep 26 '13 at 3:26
    
Well done! (+1)! –  Ricardo Saporta Sep 26 '13 at 3:32
    
Not to be a doom-sayer, but I can break this answer for the example of: x <- c(-0.6, -0.3, 0.5, 0.6, 3, 4.1, 6.7, 3.7, 7.5, 4.1, 6.8, 4.8, 3.3, 1.6, 3.1, 2, 1.3, 2.9, 2.8, 1.9, 0, -0.5, -0.6, 0.3, 1.9, 5.1, 6.4) –  thelatemail Sep 26 '13 at 5:11
1  
@thelatemail I suspect Andy was assuming only integer values allowed. –  Carl Witthoft Sep 26 '13 at 11:35

UPDATE: Edited, Tested, & Benchmarks added.

(sorry I was unable to test yesterday)


Here is a solution that is essentially pure logical comparisons and is 20% faster than zoo

identical(results, UpAndDown(x))
# [1] TRUE

## 2,000 iterations, less than 0.1 seconds. 
> system.time(for(i in 1:2000) UpAndDown(x))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.080   0.001   0.082 

UpAndDown <- function(x, lowBound=0, upBound=5, numeric=TRUE) {
  ## This gets most of it
  high <-  (x >= upBound)
  low  <-  (x <= lowBound)

  res <- high & !low

  ## This grabs the middle portions
  fvs <- which(x==upBound)  
  zrs <- which(x==lowBound) 

  # The middle spots are those where zrs > fvs
  m <- which(zrs > fvs)

  # This is only iterating over a vector of a handufl of indecies
  #  It's not iterating over x
  mids <- unlist(lapply(m, function(i) seq(fvs[i], zrs[i]-1)), use.names=FALSE)
  res[mids] <- TRUE

  if (numeric)
    res <- as.numeric(res)

  # logical
  return(res)

}

Benchmarks:

# Small x
microbenchmark(UpAndDown=UpAndDown(x), Entex=entex(x,5,0), ZOO=na.locf(c(NA,1,0)[(x==5) + 2*(x<=0) + 1],na.rm=FALSE))

Unit: microseconds
      expr    min      lq  median      uq     max neval
 UpAndDown 31.573 36.1965 42.4240 46.9765 146.599   100
     Entex 40.113 46.1030 51.9605 57.3170 114.269   100
       ZOO 60.169 68.7335 78.2480 83.0360 176.159   100

Larger x:

# With Larger x

x <- c(seq(-10, 10), seq(11, -7), seq(-8, 15), seq(16, -28), seq(-29, 100), seq(101, -9)) 
x <- c(x, x, x)
length(x)
# [1] 1050

## CONFIRM VALUES
identical(UpAndDown(x), na.locf(c(NA,1,0)[(x==5) + 2*(x<=0) + 1]))
# [1] TRUE

## Benchmark
microbenchmark(
    UpAndDown=UpAndDown(x), 
    fcp=findChangePoint(x, c(5,1)), 
    Entex=entex(x,5,0), 
    ZOO=na.locf(c(NA,1,0)[(x==5) + 2*(x<=0) + 1],na.rm=FALSE)
  )

Unit: microseconds
      expr      min        lq    median        uq       max neval
 UpAndDown  141.149  162.9125  183.8080  206.9560   403.528   100
       fcp 5719.692 6056.1760 6379.4355 7376.7370 21456.502   100
     Entex  416.570  446.8780  469.7845  501.0985   795.853   100
       ZOO  192.449  209.1260  249.3805  281.4820   489.416   100

Note: If expecting non-integer values (or, in general, the absence of the exact boundary numbers, eg 0 & 5), then use the following definitions instead

  ## ----------------------------##
    fvs <- which(high)
    zrs <- which(low)

    # This is only iterating over a vector of a handufl of indecies
    #  It's not iterating over x
    mids <- unlist(sapply(fvs, function(x) {
                                Z <- x<zrs; 
                                if (any(Z)) 
                                  seq(x, zrs[min(which(Z), na.rm=TRUE)]-1)
                            }
                  ), use.names=FALSE)
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2  
This doesn't work i dont think, i just checked –  user1234440 Sep 26 '13 at 3:08
    
Original post was made yesterday from my phone. Sorry I could not test it. It is now working –  Ricardo Saporta Sep 26 '13 at 15:49

This is really a long comment... It strikes me that this is what a Schmidt Trigger (opamp) does. That leads me to wonder if there's a way to run a while loop with a resettable condition.

limits <- c(5,0)
flop = 1
threshold<-limits[1]
for(j in 1:length(x) {

 while(x*(-1^(1-flop) < threshold) { 
do_stuff
}
threshold<-limits[flop+1]
flop <- !flop
}

I probably have a couple negative signs off there, but you get the idea.

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You can use rle() and avoid writing for/while loops altogether:

x <- c(-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,-1,-2,-1,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12)

result <- rep(99, length(x))
result[x >= 5] <- 1
result[x <= 0] <- 0

result
#  [1]  0  0  0  0  0 99 99 99 99  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 99
# [26] 99 99 99  0  0  0  0  0 99 99 99 99  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1

# Run-length-encode it
result_rle <- rle(result)
# Find the 99's and replace them with the previous value
missing_idx <- which(result_rle$values == 99)
result_rle$values[missing_idx] <- result_rle$values[missing_idx - 1]
# Inverse of the RLE
result <- inverse.rle(result_rle)

# Check value
expected <- c(0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1)
identical(result, expected)
# TRUE

Note that this will give an error if the first value is between 0 and 5, but adding a check for that is simple. You'll also need to decide what behavior you want in that case.

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