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Kind of a random question but probably useful for best practices - are there any advantages or disadvantages to getting input values at the event handler stage and passing them to the function versus getting them inside the function? As in:

$('.ep').on('click',function(event) {
   get value1
   get value2
   doSomething(value1,value2)
});

as opposed to

function doSomething()
    get value1
    get value2
    ...rest of function
}
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I don't think there's a definitive answer to this question. It all depends what doSomething does and what else is done in the click handler. And even then, it makes very little difference. Just do whatever makes the most sense in the flow of your code. –  James Montagne Sep 26 '13 at 3:55

1 Answer 1

Assuming that your second full example is:

function doSomething()
    get value1
    get value2
    ...rest of function
}

$('.ep').on('click', doSomething);

Then these two are functionally identical, so the performance is the same. In the first, you're defining an anonymous function and passing it as an argument. In the second, you're defining a named function and passing the named function as an argument. In both cases, the same function body is executed.

However, the performance of this example may be better:

var doSomething = (function(){
    get value1
    get value2
    return function(){
        ...rest of function
    }
})();

$('.ep').on('click', doSomething);

That's because in this example we use an immediate function and define value1 and value2 inside of the immediate function and return a function to assign to doSomething. This means value1 and value2 are assigned once when the immediate function executes, but thanks to Javascript closure they are both accessible inside of the function that is returned.

This is in contrast to the first two examples, which both will declare value1 and value2 every time the event fires and runs the function.

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