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I have three devices on a wireless network. One is a linux desktop, which is running wireshark, and I am trying to use the desktop to monitor the wireless traffic on my network. The other two devices on the network are an iphone and a macbook pro.

I am able to use the desktop to monitor traffic going between the router and the macbook pro. This leads be to believe that I successfully put the wireless interface on the desktop into promiscuous mode. I am also able to see the traffic between the iphone if I make the iphone check what networks are available, but normal traffic doesn't appear at all.

I thought of a number of explanations, but none of them make sense.

a) The iphone 4s only has the ability to communicate on 802.11N wireless on 2.4 GHz, so perhaps this is why I can't see any of its traffic. This, however, doesn't make sense, because if I was only looking for 5 GHz traffic, I wouldn't expect to be able to see any traffic originating from the iphone.

b) The iphone is using the cellular network. This doesn't make sense either, since I have the iphone in airplane mode connected to the wireless network only.

c) The iphone is only using channels that I am not monitoring. This doesn't make sense either, because if channel hopping really was the problem, why would the macbook pro's traffic be visible, but none the iphone's traffic not visible? This would imply that the macbook pro channel hops, while the iphone doesn't, but that the iphone goes back to the channel I happen to be monitoring when it wants to check what networks there are.

Does anyone have any ideas as to why only certain traffic from the iphone is visible?

share|improve this question
    
Does the "check what networks are available" traffic from the iPhone consist only of 802.11 beacon frames? Is this a "protected" network (using WEP or WPA/WPA2)? If so, have you entered the network's password into Wireshark, and what happens if you turn the phone off, turn it back on again while Wireshark is running, and have it send and receive network traffic? – Guy Harris Sep 26 '13 at 16:32
    
If I go to the iphone's list of wireless networks it generates a bunch of traffic that the desktop can see, but otherwise it doesn't ever generate any traffic that the desktop can see. – zelinka Sep 26 '13 at 17:37
    
As I mentioned in b), the iphone isn't connected to the cellular network at all, so any data that is going to the phone has to be going through the wireless network, unless the iphone has the ability to bypass the airplane mode setting. – zelinka Sep 26 '13 at 17:37
    
"If I go to the iphone's list of wireless networks it generates a bunch of traffic that the desktop can see" What precise sort of traffic is that? – Guy Harris Sep 26 '13 at 23:40
1  
This question is off-topic as it isn't about programming. – cybermonkey Dec 29 '14 at 10:25

Well, if We take care about that when You monitorize with wireshark a network, It doesn't care about the channels It's working in, You should capture all traffic on the network.

If You didn't, I think in two possibilities:

a) Did You put a capture filter? This is the only way to select the traffic You sniff, and maybe It's the cause why You don't take all iPhone's traffic.

b) Maybe your iPhone is using the Cell Network just for some apps or services that doesn't work with WiFi, despite of his connection to a WiFi network too.

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"Well, if We take care about that when You monitorize with wireshark a network, It doesn't care about the channels It's working in, You should capture all traffic on the network." Actually, no - in monitor mode, an 802.11 adapter will only capture packets on the channel its radio is tuned to receive from (unless it has a special extremely-broadband radio that can listen on multiple channels, but I don't know of any that do). – Guy Harris Sep 26 '13 at 16:28
    
But a network (usually) is working in just one channel, except if you have mutiple stations as Tx working in different channels to avoid colisions, doesn't it? So if you try to sniff a network traffic, you should only need to monitorize a channel. (Summarizing, I mean that usual networks will be working in just one channel, so you should capture all its traffic monitorizing that channel). – Btc Sources Sep 30 '13 at 7:39
    
Any given 802.11 network will run on one channel; if you want to capture the traffic from that network, then your adapter will have to be set to that channel, so in that sense it does care about the channel. – Guy Harris Oct 1 '13 at 9:17

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