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Recently i attended an interview where i was asked to write a recursive java code for (x^y)^z.

function power(x,y){

if(y==0){
   return 1;
}else{
  x*=power(x,y-1); 
}
}

I could manage doing it for x^y but was not getting a solution for including the z also in the recursive call. On asking for a hint, they told me instead of having 2 parameters in call u can have a array with 2 values. But even then i dint get the solution. can u suggest a solution both ways.

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1  
power(x,y,z){ return power(x,y*z); } –  ChronoTrigger Sep 26 '13 at 9:03

2 Answers 2

This is the solution I would use in python, but you could easily have done it in javascipt or any other language too:

def power(x, y):

    if y == 0:
       return 1

    if y == 1:
       return x

    return x * power(x, y - 1)


def power2(x, y, z):
    return power(power(x, y), z)

You can then use power2 to return your result. In another language you could probably overload the same function but I do not think this is possible in Python for this scenario.

For your javascript code, all you really needed to add to your solution was a second function along the lines of:

function power2(x,y,z)
{
    return power(power(x, y), z);
}

As you can see, the solution itself is also recursive despite defining a new function (or overloading your previous one).

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Michael's solution in Java Language

    public void testPower()
    {
        int val = power(2, 3, 2);
        System.out.println(val);
    }

    private int power(int x, int y, int z)
    {
        return power(power(x, y), z);
    }

    private int power(int x, int y)
    {
        if (y == 0)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        if (y == 1)
        {
            return x;
        }
        return x * power(x, y - 1);
    }

output is 64

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