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I would like to update multiple records in a MySQL table using a single query. Basically, this is a tasks table, which has assignments for different people on different dates. When these assignments are changed and submitted via the Online form there is a lot of POST data that gets submitted (pretty much all the pending assignments). I've written an algorithm that sorts through all this information and gets what I want out of it, but I'm stuck on writing the query to update the MySQL table:

  // Find the modified records and save their information
  $update = 0;
  for ( $n = 0; $n < $total_records; $n++ )
  {
     if ( $_POST['update'.$n] == true )
     {
        $updates_arr[$update] = array( intval($_POST['user_id'.$n]), intval($_POST['task'.$n]), $_POST['date'.$n] );
        $update++;
     }
  }

  if ( $mysql_db = OpenDatabase() )
  {
     $query  = "UPDATE tasks_tbl";
     if ( $updates_arr[0] )
     {
        $query .= "   SET task = ".$updates_arr[0][1]." WHERE user_id = ".$updates_arr[0][0]." AND date = ".$updates_arr[0][2];
     }

     for ( $n = 1; $n < $updates; $n++ )
     {
        $query .= ",   SET task = ".$updates_arr[$n][1]." WHERE user_id = ".$updates_arr[$n][0]." AND date = ".$updates_arr[$n][2];
     }

     $result = mysql_query( $query, $mysql_db );

     if ( $result )
     {
        $page .= "<p>Success!</p>\n\n";
     }
     else
     {
        $page .= "<p>Error: ".mysql_error()."</p>\n\n";
     }
  }

This is the query that is generated:

UPDATE tasks_tbl 
   SET task = 1 
 WHERE user_id = 16 
   AND date = 2010-05-05,  
   SET task = 1 
 WHERE user_id = 17 
   AND date = 2222-02-22

Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
For really large numbers of inserts, it may be beneficial to do a bulk INSERT into a temporary table, and then UPDATE the target table using values from the temporary table. –  Frank Farmer Dec 14 '09 at 18:32
    
why would you want to do it this way? you run the risk of not updating multiple items when only one of them fails. wouldn't it be better to trap individual transactions for failures so they can be displayed to the user? –  Jeremy S Dec 14 '09 at 18:34
    
There is more to the algorithm than I have shown here. All data is validated, prior to running the query, so there should never be an instance where invalid data could case the query to fail. –  Jim Fell Dec 14 '09 at 18:45
    
Sorry, I may have used a bad example. Sometimes task would need to be set to 1, 2, or 3, depending on what it was changed to via the task list form. For example, let's say table entries 2 and 3 both need to be updated. Both entries have different user_ids and dates. Let's say that entry 2 needs to be assigned to task 1 and entry 3 needs to be assigned to task 3. Is there a way to do this without running multiple queries? –  Jim Fell Dec 14 '09 at 18:51
    
Is there any reason why these need to be in one query? Why do you not want to run multiple queries? –  Matt McCormick Dec 14 '09 at 18:58

6 Answers 6

You can generate a query like this:

UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task=1 WHERE 
    (user_id=16 AND date='2010-05-05') OR
    (user_id=17 AND date='2010-02-22')

There are hacks to avoid using (... and ...) or (... and ...) constructs (concatenate fields and params: "concat(user_id, date) = '". $user_id. $date. "'", but they work a bit slower.

The PHP code:

for ($i = 0; !empty($_POST['update'. $i]; $i++)
    if (intval($_POST['task'.$i]) == 1)
        $cond[] = '(user_id='. intval($_POST['user_id'. $i]).
        ' and date=\''. mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['date'.$i]). '\')';

$query = 'UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task=1 WHERE '. implode(' OR ', $cond). ')';

Edit: I don't quite understand why you need to do that in a single query. How many values task can have? 1, 2, 3, or many more? With 3 values, you can use nested IF(...) functions:

UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task=if('. <imploded tasks with value 1>. ', 1, if('.
<tasks with value 2>. ', 2, if('. <tasks with 3>. ', 3,
task))) /* leave as is otherwise */

Or you may put a simple loop on the code I've given:

for ($j = 1; $j <= 3; $j++)
    for ($i = 0; !empty($_POST['update'. $i]; $i++)
        if (intval($_POST['task'.$i]) == 1)
            $cond[] = '(user_id='. intval($_POST['user_id'. $i]).
            ' and date=\''. mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['date'.$i]). '\')';

    mysql_query('UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task=1 WHERE '. implode(' OR ', $cond). ')');
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming task is always set to 1.. –  stuartd Dec 14 '09 at 18:15
    
Ooops! Thanks, fixed that :) –  culebrón Dec 14 '09 at 18:19

I disagree with your architecture here, but the following should work. Use at your own risk:

UPDATE
     Tasks_Table
SET
     task =
          CASE
               WHEN user_id = 16 AND date = 2010-05-05 THEN 1
               WHEN user_id = 17 AND date = 2222-02-22 THEN 1
               ...
          END
WHERE
     (user_id = 16 AND date = 2010-05-05) OR
     (user_id = 17 AND date = 2222-02-22) OR
     ...

In your example you have task = 1 in all cases, but with the CASE statement you can change them to be what you need for each case. I'll leave the string building to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tom. I see how this works although it would be ugly and a pain to ever debug. –  Matt McCormick Dec 14 '09 at 19:27
    
This does look interesting. Are CASE statements commonly used, or is this a more obscure feature of MySQL? –  Jim Fell Dec 16 '09 at 14:58
    
Actually, I'm a MS SQL developer for the most part. The CASE statement is a part of the SQL ANSI standard, so it should be available in most RDBMSs –  Tom H. Dec 16 '09 at 15:33

I would prefer to use a prepared query and loop over the data (inside a transaction if needed). That makes it simpler to understand, which is better for maintainability.

Your code smells of sql injection insecurity, too, which prepared queries would eliminate.

See: http://www.php.net/manual/en/mysqli.prepare.php or even better with PDO prepare:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but this looks like it would require a drastic re-write of all the PHP -> MySQL code on my website. Right now, I'm considering switching from mysql_connect() to mysql_pconnect(), which should only require a few changes. I'll definitely keep the mysqli APIs in mind for my next site, though! –  Jim Fell Dec 16 '09 at 15:05
    
There is a lot more code than what I have shown. I do use the mysql_real_escape_string() and validate the results to be within expected ranges, so it would be pretty difficult, if not impossible, to inject anything into the query. –  Jim Fell Dec 16 '09 at 15:07

Are you looking for this:

UPDATE tasks_tbl 
   SET task = 1 
 WHERE (user_id = 16 AND date = 2010-05-05) 
       OR (user_id = 17 AND date = 2222-02-22)

Or you are trying to set 'task' to different values in different rows with a single statement? The latter is just not possible

share|improve this answer
    
it's possible with find_in_set & elt functions. Just 2 levels of function call stack. –  culebrón Dec 14 '09 at 18:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I ended up going with the multiple queries, as it apparently was not going to be as simple to do, as I had hoped.

    foreach ( $updates_arr as $record => $data ):
       $query  = "UPDATE tasks_tbl";
       $query .= "   SET task = ".$data[1];
       $query .= "   WHERE task_id = ".$data[0];
       $result = mysql_query( $query, $mysql_db );
       if ( !$result )
       {
          break;
       }
       endforeach;
share|improve this answer
    
Again, If you would use prepared statements, you wouldn't have to rebuild the query string every time through the loop, you wouldn't send the entire query over the network every time, the sql server would not have to parse the sql every time, and you would be protected from SQL injection, which your code is not. –  DGM Dec 15 '09 at 15:31

I don't think this is possible with one statement. You will need to create separate UPDATE statements:

UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task = 1 WHERE user_id = 16 AND date = 2010-05-05;
UPDATE tasks_tbl SET task = 1 WHERE user_id = 17 AND date = 2222-02-22

You can pass them into mysql_query() as one string separated by ';' if you set mysql to accept multiple queries:

Multiple queries seem to be supported. You just have to pass flag 65536 as mysql_connect's 5 parameter (client_flags)

share|improve this answer
1  
First complete sentence in the documentation: mysql_query() sends a unique query (multiple queries are not supported) to the currently active database on the server that's associated with the specified link_identifier . –  Richard Simões Dec 14 '09 at 18:18
    
I didn't realise the only update would be changing the task to 1. I think it'd be easier to just issue a new statement for each UPDATE. –  Matt McCormick Dec 14 '09 at 18:30
    
It is not possible because he clarified that some tasks will be set to 1, 2 or 3 –  Matt McCormick Dec 14 '09 at 19:05
    
It's still quite possible to do in one query. It might not be a good idea, but it's possible. –  Tom H. Dec 14 '09 at 19:14
    
I would be interested in seeing the MYSQL code for that Tom. I'm unaware that I can issue conditional SETs with one UPDATE statement. –  Matt McCormick Dec 14 '09 at 19:21

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