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#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main()
{
char name[32][32];
char input[32];
int number;
int i;

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    fgets(input,sizeof(input),stdin);
    sscanf(input,%s,name[i]);

}  

//assume that we don't know variable name have 10 element of arrays.

//function to count how many elements of arrays to stored at number.

for(i=0;i<number;i++)
{
    printf("%s",name[i]);
}
}

What function can count the elements of the arrays?

share|improve this question
2  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6716983/…. –  James Elderfield Sep 26 '13 at 11:19
    
can you please explain what do you want to count? The number of elements in the array?? –  nikoo28 Sep 26 '13 at 11:19
    
@Jefffrey I think OP is referring to 10 items stored in the array, not size of the array. –  Kinjal Dixit Sep 26 '13 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about initialising your target strings to 0 then checking if they are not null whilst printing?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main()
{
    char name[32][32] = {0};
     ...
     for(i=0;i<32;i++)
     {
         if(name[i][0]!='\0')
             printf("%s",name[i]);
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
What if I enter a blank line (name[i] = "")? –  Evert Sep 26 '13 at 11:47
    
Then it doesn't get counted. As per the OP. –  Neil Sep 26 '13 at 12:15

C does not maintain this kind of information. It is up to the developer to implement some way of knowing that the item in the array is valid or not. Typically this is done by selecting an 'invalid value', which is a value that is never going to occur in real data. Another way of doing this is to separately maintain a count.

This is all fine for learning C. If you are doing this for the real world, you would be much better off using data structures like lists. If you are using C++, I would suggest that you learn STL.

Simple C solution would be something like this. The value of "empty" is used to indicate any value which will not occur normally in the input. You can change the #define to any other value you want like "-----" or ".". We begin by initializing the entire array to "empty"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX_ITEMS 32
#define MAX_LENGTH 32
#define EMPTY "empty"

int main(void)
{
        char name[MAX_ITEMS][MAX_LENGTH];
        char input[MAX_LENGTH];
        int i;

        for(i = 0; i < MAX_ITEMS; i++)
        {
                strcpy(name[i], EMPTY);
        }

        for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
                fgets(input, MAX_LENGTH, stdin);
                sscanf(input, "%s", name[i]);
        }

        for(i = 0; strcmp(name[i], EMPTY) && i < MAX_ITEMS; i++)
        {
                printf("%s\n", name[i]);
        }

        return(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh!! my false. sorry, I'm not good at english and meanings @Kinjail Dixit Yes, I want to know the function can count item stored in the arrays –  Barbiyong Sep 26 '13 at 11:54
    
@BarbiyongIcpe check the code. –  Kinjal Dixit Sep 26 '13 at 13:47
    
Oh Thanks a lot. I can using your guide to apply with my program. you're explain clearly –  Barbiyong Sep 27 '13 at 1:58
    
I apply your code and have new problems. haha stackoverflow.com/q/19042523/2817936 –  Barbiyong Sep 27 '13 at 4:07

This one is a solution.
But i don't know why it is not working while trying to make a array_length function.

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){
     int a[]={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0};
     int len;
     len = sizeof(a)/sizeof(*a);
     printf("Length is %d\n",len);
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
len = sizeof(a) / sizeof(int) –  koodawg Sep 26 '13 at 14:34

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