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I have a following scenario. Several threads are waiting on the same condition. And when are notified, all should stop waiting, change flag and return object:

 public Object getObject(){
    lock.lock();
    try {
        while (check)){
            condition.await();
        }

        return returnObjectAndSetCheckToFalse();
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
}

however this code does not work, since faster thread could change check flag to false, and second slower thread will block again. It is possible to have a logic that both waiting threads will be awaken, they both will set check flag to false, and return object? Or maybe it is contradictory?

The easiest way would be to change wait to if statement, however this would be vulnerable to spurious wakeup.

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Lateral suggestion: look at java.util.concurrent and use an appropriate higher-level construct. –  millimoose Sep 26 '13 at 13:20
    
I was thinking about using future, but the implementation would require such code anyway. –  gomul Sep 26 '13 at 13:20
    
How so? Having all the threads wait on the same Future seems like it'd be sufficient. (It's hard to tell since you haven't shown a use case.) You might have to restructure your code a bit so the data-flow is based on "pulling" objects from producers into consumers, but that's generally a good idea anyway. –  millimoose Sep 26 '13 at 13:21
    
code in future would be almost the same. check will be an Future.isDone() - but with negation. whereas return and set will return and set done value to true. –  gomul Sep 26 '13 at 13:26
1  
What exactly do you want to achieve? –  axtavt Sep 26 '13 at 13:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I understand you need to return from the method body in all threads if your condition.await() returns. This ugly solution should help although I think there's a better way to solve this:

public Object getObject() {
  lock.lock();
  try {
    int localstate = this.state;

    while (check && localstate == this.state)) {
      condition.await(); // all threads that are waiting here have the same state
    }

    if (!check) {
      this.state++; // first thread will change state thus making other threads ignore the 'check' value
    }

    return returnObjectAndSetCheckToFalse();
  } finally {
    lock.unlock();
  }
}
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well, apears that it might actually solve my problem. state is atomicInt/Long ofc. –  gomul Sep 26 '13 at 15:18
1  
int is sufficient if state has read/write access between locks. –  rwiatr Sep 26 '13 at 15:22

You could use CountDownLatch or a CyclicBarrier.

Using a Future is also a possibility, a FutureTask to be more specific. It has a conveniance method get() which can be used to block code execution until the Future has completed its job, thus fulfilling your requirements.

You could also implement your own Barrier which would do wait() in a loop until a certain condition has been met. Fulfilling that condition would trigger notifyAll(), loop would finish and all threads could continue. But that would be reinventing the wheel.

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Why would you need FutureTask? ExecutorService.submit() will create it for you anyway, and all the methods you need are exposed over the Future interface. –  millimoose Sep 26 '13 at 13:42
    
@millimoose who said anything about ExecutorService? FutureTask is a class, not an interface; it has all the necessary code to what OP wanted (protected done() and public get()). –  Dariusz Sep 26 '13 at 18:07

What I think is you're trying to achieve, done using Futures:

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

// producer
final Future<String> producer = executor.submit(new Callable<String>() {
    @Override
    public String call() throws Exception {
        Thread.sleep(5000);
        return "done";
    }
});

// consumers
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    final int _i = i;
    executor.submit(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Consumer "+_i+" starts.");
            try {
                String value = producer.get();
                System.out.println("Consumer "+_i+" ends: "+value);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });
}

If you run this, you should see all the consumer threads printing out their starting message, then a pause, then the consumer threads print out they're done. Obviously you'd have to change whatever is producing the value of getObject() into a Callable but I'd bet good money this will simplify the code since now it'll be structured procedurally instead of storing the result of a computation in a shared variable. I'm also more confident it's thread safe than of any code using manual locking.

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One way of doing it is using wait() instead of condition.await(). Then use notifyAll() to wake up the threads.

Ideally, you would continue using the condition object that causes the thread to sleep and invoke the method signalAll() to wake up all the threads.

In you code I would just add:

public Object getObject(){
lock.lock();
try {
    while (check)){
        condition.await();
    }
        condition.signalAll();
    return returnObjectAndSetCheckToFalse();
} finally {
    lock.unlock();
}

}

I would even look at the possibility of using the condition.signalAll() inside the returnObjectAndSetCheckToFalse() method instead of before the return statement.

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it doesn't help anyway. threads need to wait (no matter of what method) in a while loop checking condition. After they are notified, first thread will change the condition anyway and other slower threads will block in a loop again. –  gomul Sep 26 '13 at 13:51
2  
Why go even lower level? By the way condition has a signalAll which is equivalent to notifyAll. –  assylias Sep 26 '13 at 13:51
    
@assylias that is true. I overlooked that. Let me edit my answer. –  Jorge Sep 26 '13 at 14:01
    
@gomul The problem is that even if you change the check flag, only threads that haven't been told to wait will continue executing. You definitely need to notify threads that are waiting. Which thread will continue first after being notified is very dependent on how Java implements their threads. When I was doing Java concurrency I never saw thread speed being constant, it was very arbitrary to me. –  Jorge Sep 26 '13 at 14:14
    
your code will not work any way. it might happen that thread that one thread invoked signalAll and then immediately returnObjectAndSetCheckToFalse whereas second was aweaken but hasn't check the condition yet. Second thread will check it when first thread already changed check_value –  gomul Sep 26 '13 at 14:35

Indeed it it is contradictory. What you want to achieve is problematic. You want threads waiting on the condition should get result and continue, but a thread that invokes getObject just after notification would not. At least, it is unfair. Whether that thread manages to call getObject before notification or not, is pure random thing. You should decrease indeterminism, not to increase it.

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