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I have a generic Repo class that exposes a database LINQ provider:

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted
{
    IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        return _queryable;
    }
}

(IPersisted is a simple marker interface for persisted objects).

Now... I would like to find an elegant way to inject a default LINQ expression for certain derived types of IPersisted. For example, for the following IPersisted implementation:

class Deletable : IPersisted
{
    bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
}

I want the IQueryable<T> Get() method to return _queryable.Where(q => !q.IsDeleted), only when T is of type Deletable.

I thought about creating some type of dictionary map IDictionary<Type, Expression>, and doing a lookup on typeof(T) inside the Get method but I'm not sure that I'll be able to strongly type the expressions in this case.

How can I inject a "default" LINQ expression into the Get method, based on the type of T? I'd like to have an extensible, object oriented way of mapping types to default expressions.

share|improve this question
    
I doubt you'll make anything perfectly strongly-typed, since in the C# type system you can't express a constraint "a mapping from T to something generic featuring T, for arbitrary values of T" –  millimoose Sep 26 '13 at 13:27
    
Sounds like your Repo should be derived from a base class rather than an interface. –  Khan Sep 26 '13 at 13:32
1  
What about intorducing IDeletable interface. Then you could check if T is oftype IDeletable and return your query the way you want it? –  epitka Sep 26 '13 at 13:33
    
@Zaid, what is the type of expression here? Is it not going to be Func<T, bool> always? –  nawfal Sep 26 '13 at 13:34
    
@nawfal yes we can assume it will always be Func<T, bool> –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 13:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since each IPersisted type is going to have its own expression, I would make that a constraint on the part of IPersisted. So now you have some kind of polymorphism.

Something like?

interface IPersisted<T> where T: IPersisted<T>
{
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> Predicate { get; }
}

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted<T>, new()
{
    public IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        var dummy = new T();
        return _queryable.Where(dummy.Predicate);
    }
}

class Deletable : IPersisted<Deletable>
{
    public Deletable()
    {

    }

    public Expression<Func<Deletable, bool>> Predicate
    {
        get { return x => !x.IsDeleted; }
    }

    bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
}

I think what you need here is some kind of static polymorphism, but since C# doesnt offer that, you might need create a dummy instance for yourself, just to get the expression.


If you can't have a default constructor, then you can rely on FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t). You can adjust your Get method like this:

public IQueryable<T> Get()
{
    var dummy = (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T));
    return _queryable.Where(dummy.Predicate);
}

Two things out of possibly many things to note about FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject:

  1. It will not initialize anything or run the constructor, but that shouldn't be a problem for us.

  2. It's relatively slower. Shouldn't be a big deal since you can cache the instances :) Something like:

    class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted<T>
    {
        //caching mechanism: this is run only once per instance; you can make it 
        //static if this shud be run only once the entire lifetime of application
        readonly T dummy = (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T));
    
        public IQueryable<T> Get()
        {
            return _queryable.Where(dummy.Predicate);
        }
    }
    

If the exact expression is not important, then you can get rid of the object instantiation. Something like:

interface IPersisted<T> where T: IPersisted<T>
{
    Func<T, bool> Predicate { get; }
}

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted<T>
{
    public IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        return _queryable.Where(x => x.Predicate(x));
    }
}

class Deletable : IPersisted<Deletable>
{
    public Func<Deletable, bool> Predicate
    {
        get { return x => !x.IsDeleted; }
    }
}

If preserving the original definition of IPersisted is important, then you can make it non-generic. Not sure if that would make it any less strongly-typed.

interface IPersisted
{
    Expression<Func<object, bool>> Predicate { get; }
}

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted
{
    public IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        return _queryable.Where(dummy.Predicate);
    }
}

class Deletable : IPersisted
{
    public Expression<Func<object, bool>> Predicate
    {
        get { return x => !((Deletable)x).IsDeleted; }
    }
}

The above approach can be made more strongly typed by going for a method in IPersisted but need not be good enough a constraint:

interface IPersisted
{
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> GetPredicate<T>() where T : IPersisted;
}

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted
{
    public IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        return _queryable.Where(dummy.GetPredicate<T>());
    }
}

class Deletable : IPersisted
{
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> IPersisted.GetPredicate<T>() //made it explicit
    {
        return x => ((Deletable)(object)x).IsDeleted;
    }
}

Note: Make the Predicate implementation explicit if it doesn't make sense outside the Repo<T> class.

share|improve this answer
    
This is useful. The only problem is that I have to introduce an empty constructor constraint, and I've created most of my IPersisted implementations without empty constructors in order to force initialization of required fields. Static polymorphism would be wonderful for this case. –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 14:16
    
@ZaidMasud another way of tackling is to bring in some kind of hacks, is performance important? –  nawfal Sep 26 '13 at 14:18
    
Well I suppose performance is always important :) But what kind of hacks did you have in mind? Are you thinking of something like using Activator with default constructor types? –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 14:21
    
@ZaidMasud, even for activator, you need a default constructor (and public). I will edit my answer :) –  nawfal Sep 26 '13 at 14:21
1  
FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject... good one. Learned something new. Will try it out and if things work out I'll accept the answer. Thanks. –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 15:01

Not sure if we're 100% on the same page but this get method example will take a linq Func which you can use as a where clause to filter your query.

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted
{
    IQueryable<T> Get(Func<T, bool> filter)
    {
        return _queryable.Where(filter);
    }
}

Edit: Not sure if this will translate well to sql but to make sure i have the right idea of what you want (and maybe spark a light) : Have you considered something like this?

class Repo<T> where T : IPersisted
{
    IQueryable<T> Get()
    {
        if (typeof (T).IsAssignableFrom(typeof (IDeletable)))
        {
            return _queryable.Where(o => ((IDeletable) o).Deleted = false).AsQueryable();
        }
        return _queryable;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I was to go this route the usage would become something like Get(q => !q.IsDeleted) and I'd rather just keep it as is and say Get().Where(q => !q.IsDeleted). The point here is for the Get method to automatically inject the expression based on the type, without the consumer getting involved. –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 13:47
    
Regarding your edit... yes this is exactly the type of thing I need, but in a more extensible manner as I want to have these expressions for multiple interfaces in addition to IDeletable. I'd rather not do it using a long list of if statements if I can avoid it. –  Zaid Masud Sep 26 '13 at 14:05
1  
Have you considered a strategy pattern where you hold a list of say IFilters. Each filter has 2 methods : bool DoesFilterApplyForType(Type) and another method to actually apply the filter if the first method returned true. You could inject the list of IFilters using dependency injection if you want. –  Kristof Sep 26 '13 at 14:10

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