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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
char* p=new char[10];
p="sudheer";
char* q=new char[10];
q=p;
delete []p;

return 0;
}

When I run the above program, it crashes with delete. Any comments?

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8  
Pro tip: use std::string instead. –  Jefffrey Sep 26 '13 at 15:01
1  
A tutorial on pointers will surely help you. Take a look at any of the recommended C++ books –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 26 '13 at 15:44

4 Answers 4

Yes you are deleting a string literal "sudheer", that's enough to crash a program.

I think your error is not understanding how to copy a C string, use strcpy for that. Also if you use new [], you must use delete[] not delete . You probably meant to write this program

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    char* p=new char[10];
    strcpy(p,"sudheer"); // use strcpy to copy C strings
    char* q=new char[10];
    q=p;
    delete[] p;

    return 0;
}
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At least have strcpy(q,p); as well, and delete q... –  rabensky Sep 26 '13 at 15:07
    
But it didnt crash with p="sudheer". As I have mentioned it was crashed with delete []p;. –  Sudheer Kumar Sep 26 '13 at 15:09
    
@user2820017 p="sudheer"; is not an error, deleting p after doing p="sudheer"; is an error. p is just a pointer, it points to memory. When you do delete[] p; it must be pointing at dynamically allocated memory. When you wrote p="sudheer"; you made p point to a string literal, not to dynamically allocated memory. –  john Sep 26 '13 at 15:12

the literal constant "sudheer" is understood as a pointer to a 8 bytes read-only memory zone.

You are deleting it, this is undefined behavior. The previous result of p=new char[10] is a non-reachable memory zone. You have a memory leak.

I suggest using std::string so declare

std::string p = "sudheer";
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p is a pointer to characters. First, you create 10 character memory block and tell p to point to that (p=new char[10];). The next line you tell p to instead point to another memory block with the text "sudheer" in it (p="sudheer";).

At this point p no longer points to the memory block you allocated so deleting p doesn't deallocate that block. It tries to deallocate the string.

Indeed - nothing points to the 10 character memory block anymore. It is lost inside the memory of the computer. This is a memory leak.

Notice you are doing the same with q. If you want to copy strings use strcpy. Or, obviously, you could use std::string (with #include <string>) and then have strings that act like you expect them to act instead of pointers use in c.

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p="sudheer";

and then

delete p; 

It fails as you overrun dynamically allocated p and then trying to delete it.

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