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I've been looking for this, but I can't find an answer. The only thing I get is linq projections, but nothing on this.

I have a function receiving a entity framework table parameter lets say "customer", like this:

public partial class customer
{
    public customer()
    {
    }

    public int id { get; set; }
    public string descripcion { get; set; }
    public bool activo { get; set; }

}

........

public virtual customer Load(customer paramEntity)
{
      using (BillingDbContext bd = new BillingDbContext())
      {
          paramEntity = (from s in bd.customer
                    select s).First();
      }

      return paramEntity;
}

NOTE: the First() is only for the example, I'm actually using a function with a predicate parameter to filter (where) the results

What I want is, instead of receiving a new object from the linq, use the linq to populate my parameter (paramEntity), so I won't lose my parameter reference.

Is this possible? without copying each property from one variable to another?

Why I want this? Because when I call the function, I use an inherited class from customer, and I want later to override the Load function. like this:

public class customerX : customer
{    
    public float saldo {get; set;}

}

........

public override customer Load(customer paramEntity)
{
        customerX e = (customerX)base.Load(paramEntity);
        e.saldo = SomeFunctionLoadSaldo(e.id);

        return e;
}

........

customerX c = (customerX)Load(new customerX());

NOTE: if I won't pass the inherited class (customerX) from the beginning, then in the "base.Load" throw me an error, because it cant cast from customer to customerX. That's why I need to keep my variable reference.

share|improve this question
    
create a CustomerX in the Query? Aka select new CustomerX {} instead of a simple select s. –  Ralf Sep 26 '13 at 15:27
    
@Ralf That still won't populate the passed in instance, but rather create a new one. –  Servy Sep 26 '13 at 15:27
    
the only way I see to do it is to copy every property from one object to the adder. –  Pedro.The.Kid Sep 26 '13 at 15:28
    
@Servy - I was presenting an alternative because IMHO what he wants isn't really possible. –  Ralf Sep 26 '13 at 15:29
    
I think you are looking for a way to copy the data from one object to another, am I correct? –  eestein Sep 26 '13 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use AutoMapper to move the properties from one object to another. E.g.

public virtual customer Load(customer paramEntity)
{
    using (BillingDbContext bd = new BillingDbContext())
    {
        var dbEntity = (from s in bd.customer
                    select s).First();
        Mapper.Map(dbEntity, paramEntity);
    }

    return paramEntity;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seconded, AutoMapper feels like cheating. –  Preston Sep 26 '13 at 15:31
    
this seems like a excelent workaround –  jrivam Sep 26 '13 at 15:58
    
so its not possible to populate the variable from linq? –  jrivam Sep 26 '13 at 15:59
1  
@jrivam It shouldn't, even if it would be. LINQ is for querying. It's for fetching data. LINQ queries shouldn't be causing side effects, such as changing the data in some existing object instance. That said, it's not even possible through an EF query; it would need to be linq to objects code for the LINQ code to even have access to the variable. –  Servy Sep 26 '13 at 16:01
    
@Servy yeah you're rigth, i finnaly see why. thank you. –  jrivam Sep 26 '13 at 16:06

Considering that Customer is a class, so a reference type by coding like you wrote:

(from s in bd.customer select s).First();

you actually return a the same reference available in collection, like a LINQ query. In your case refering to the database you need a method that projects data from the object constructed form database to the object you already have.

share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter: reason ? –  Tigran Sep 26 '13 at 15:44
    
.First() can be null - Always check for null or Linq will throw an exemption –  PhillyNJ Sep 26 '13 at 16:00
1  
@PhilVallone good point, thank you, i will. the First() is only for the example, im actually using a function with a predicate parameter to filter the results. –  jrivam Sep 26 '13 at 16:05

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