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This is partly related to maths, but since I'm doing it in VB.NET (and because a programmer knows maths but a mathematician may not know programming :)), I'm more likely to get a quicker answer here:

I'm printing images in a tabular format. Each page has M rows and N columns. If the number of images exceeds what can be accommodated on one page, we move on to next page and so on. The problem here is, given the index number of an image, what is the shortest expression that would give me the zero-based row / column of the image (ignorant of the page number on which it will fall)?

After spending some time, I have come up with the following, but it doesn't handle some corner cases (M is number of columns, N is number of rows, Index is 1-based):

Dim R = (Index - Index Mod (M * N)) \ M - 1 
Dim C = Index Mod M 

N.B. The printing goes from left-to-right first and then to next row.

share|improve this question
    
@Downvoter. Comments? –  dotNET Sep 26 '13 at 15:42
    
(I didn't downvote) Consired removing .net and vb.net tags, as this question can be applied to any language/framework. –  BartoszKP Sep 26 '13 at 15:44
    
@BartoszKP: Consider MOD and \ –  dotNET Sep 26 '13 at 15:46
    
Yes, they are .net specific however they yield incorrect results and are overcomplicated - thus irrelevant. –  BartoszKP Sep 26 '13 at 15:50
    
Removed the tags. However I do not agree to overcomplicated thing. They have better readability and faster execution (no function call overhead). –  dotNET Sep 26 '13 at 15:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, I'll redefine the notation:

rowCount = N
columnCount = M

If page is irrelevant, then first alter the index to be page-ignorant:

pageSize = rowCount * columnCount
index = index % pageSize

Then, if you're iterating rows first (by this I mean then when the index moves, it goes to the next column - so it slides along a row, and at the end of the row it goes to the next row) then:

rowNumber = floor(index / columnCount)
columnNumber = index - rowNumber * columnCount

Examples with last index for 2x3 grid:

rowCount = 2
columnCount = 3
page1
 c0 c1 c2
----------
|0 |1 |2 | r0
---------- 
|3 |4 |5 | r1
----------
page2
 c0 c1 c2
----------
|6 |7 |8 | r0
----------
|9 |10|11| r1
----------

when index = 5 then:

pageSize = 2*3 = 6
index = 5 % 6 = 5
rowNumber = floor(5 / 3) = 1
columnNumber = 5 - 1 * 3 = 2

when index = 11 then:

pageSize = 6 (as above)
index = 11 % 6 = 5
rowNumber = 1 (as above)
columnNumber = 2 (as above)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not iterating rows first, i.e. the printing goes from left-to-right and then to next row. I'll edit my question –  dotNET Sep 26 '13 at 15:40
    
@dotNET Well, as you can see the difference in calculations isn't very surprising :) –  BartoszKP Sep 26 '13 at 15:41
    
Are you using floor to do integer division? The backslash operator does that. –  dotNET Sep 26 '13 at 15:41
    
Yes I'm aware of existence of this operator, however the explicit way seems more readable to me. –  BartoszKP Sep 26 '13 at 15:43
    
@dotNET We have a misunderstanding about what does "rows first" mean - I've edited the answer. Hope it's clear now. –  BartoszKP Sep 26 '13 at 15:47

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