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Im new in programming, and actually know whats the problem of my code but dont have really an idea how to solve it! I wrote a demo code:

def pass1
  @user = 'Kras'
  @pass = 'zim'
  @country = 'DE'
end


def pass2
  @user = 'Hanna'
  @pass = 'Ooma'
end 

def print
  puts @user
end 

[pass1,pass2].each do
   print
 end

Output:

Hanna
Hanna

My output should be:

Kras
Hanna

I know that the problem is that the @user is assigned twice. My question is how can i avoid this? Thanks and please dont downvote it! Everyone has to make mistakes!

In my real code i have this two methods that i try to run in a loop for two users:

  def private_key
 IO.popen('cmd', 'r+') do |pipe|

# inside of irb, changing to a different directory
 pipe.puts('cd C:/OpenSSL/bin')
 pipe.puts('openssl.exe')
 pipe.puts("genrsa -out C:/Sites/keys/#{@user}private.pem 2048")   
 pipe.close_write
 end
 end

def create_csr
IO.popen('cmd', 'r+') do |pipe|

# inside of irb, changing to a different directory
pipe.puts('cd C:/OpenSSL/bin')
pipe.puts('openssl.exe')
 pipe.puts("req -config c:/OpenSSL/openssl.cnf  -new -batch -sha256 -key C:/Sites/keys/#{@username}private.pem -subj 'hal#{@user}' -out C:/Sites/keys/#{@username}csr.pem")   
 pipe.close_write
 end
 end
share|improve this question
    
In case it's not clear from the answers below, @user is set to 'Kris' and then changed to 'Hanna' when Ruby parses the code. [pass1,pass2].each do does nothing but execute print twice; you'd get the same result if you replaced that with print; print. – Cary Swoveland Sep 26 '13 at 18:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you're trying to write something akin to this, which is idiomatic Ruby, and how we'd loop over instances of an object, calling a particular method in that object:

class User

  def initialize(user, pass, country=nil)
    @user = user
    @pass = pass
    @country = country
  end

  def user
    @user
  end

end

pass1 = User.new( 'Kras', 'zim', 'DE' )
pass2 = User.new( 'Hanna', 'Ooma' ) 

[pass1, pass2].each do |o|
  puts o.user
end

Which, when run, outputs:

Kras
Hanna

Notice that I'm not printing the value inside the method, instead I'm retrieving its value, then printing it. That lets me build up functionality in layers. I could have a print_user method, but I'd be stuck with what it can do:

def print_user
  puts @user
end

It only outputs to the console, or wherever STDOUT is pointing to. If I needed to write that to a file, I'd have to write another method that takes a filename. If I wanted to send the value to a database I'd have to write another method that takes a database DSN. That's silly, and instead my object manipulates and returns things about itself, and then I'd have some external methods that handle the I/O for the values I get back.

Back to your code: It looks like you're trying to use methods to create states of your variables, which is doable, but isn't really the way you should do it. Sometimes we'd want to toggle settings of an object en masse, but normally we'd do that as a method in a class, perhaps something like this:

class User

  attr_reader :favorite_color, :favorite_food

  def initialize(user, pass, country=nil)
    @user = user
    @pass = pass
    @country = country

    @favorite_color = 'orange'
    @favorite_food = 'pumpkins'
  end

  def change_color_and_food(c, f)
    @favorite_color = c
    @favorite_food = f
  end
end

pass1 = User.new( 'Kras', 'zim', 'DE' )

pass1.change_color_and_food('red', 'beets')

Running that lets us change the food and color preferences to "beets" and "red":

pass1.favorite_food # => "beets"

Looking at your additional code, it looks like it could be streamlined (AKA DRY'd AKA "Don't Repeat Yourself"). I don't use Windows so I can't test this, but the following code looks about right:

def private_key
  Dir.chdir('C:/OpenSSL/bin') do 
    system('openssl.exe')
    system("genrsa -out C:/Sites/keys/#{@user}private.pem 2048")   
  end
end

def create_csr
  Dir.chdir('C:/OpenSSL/bin') do 
    system('openssl.exe')
    system("req -config c:/OpenSSL/openssl.cnf  -new -batch -sha256 -key C:/Sites/keys/#{@username}private.pem -subj 'hal#{@user}' -out C:/Sites/keys/#{@username}csr.pem")   
  end
end

Ruby's Dir.chdir takes a block, so it will change the directory to the parameter given, execute the commands in the block, then pop the dir when it exits.

And, instead of opening a pipe, you should be able to use system which looks like it'd accomplish what you're trying to do.

But wait! There's more!

There's still redundancy afoot so I'd DRY it more:

def create(cmd)
  Dir.chdir('C:/OpenSSL/bin') do 
    system('openssl.exe')
    system(cmd)   
  end
end

def private_key(u)
  create("genrsa -out C:/Sites/keys/#{ u.user }private.pem 2048")   
end

def create_csr(u)
  create("req -config c:/OpenSSL/openssl.cnf  -new -batch -sha256 -key C:/Sites/keys/#{ u.username }private.pem -subj 'hal#{ u.user }' -out C:/Sites/keys/#{@username}csr.pem")   
end

Those methods don't need to be part of your User class, they just know how to access the methods used to retrieve attributes from an instance of that class.

Pass in an instance of your user to either method as the parameter, and the methods will do the right thing if your user looks something like this:

class User

  attr_accessor :user, :username, :pass, :country

  def initialize(user, username, pass, country=nil)
    @user = user
    @username = username
    @pass = pass
    @country = country
  end

  # ...more methods specific to users...

end

Like I said, I don't have Windows, so that's untested, but it's a lot closer to being what Ruby code should be.

share|improve this answer
1  
Like I said, I don't have Windows, so I can't test. Using IO.popen shouldn't be necessary, and system should work. Your "isn't working" doesn't tell me anything useful, so, as a wild guess, I'd say you need to use the entire path to the command you want to use. Sub-processes usually have a very limited environment so searchable executable paths aren't available, meaning the entire path to the command has to be specified. That's what we'd do with Linux or Mac OS. See stackoverflow.com/questions/5531498, especially the second answer and ruby-forum.com/topic/151900 – the Tin Man Sep 26 '13 at 18:36

Your Problem

Your basic problem is that your array isn't populated with user names, but rather with the return values of your methods, so #print is only operating on whatever is currently stored in the @user variable.

A Solution with Struct

Refactor the whole mess and use a Struct to get at the member variables. For example:

class Pass < Struct.new(:user, :pass, :country)
end

pass1 = Pass.new 'Kras', 'zim', 'DE'
pass2 = Pass.new 'Hanna', 'Ooma'

[pass1, pass2].map { |pass| p pass.user }

#=> ["Kras", "Hanna"]

This will print:

"Kras"
"Hanna"

and also return an array, which you can use or discard as you see fit.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my question with my original methods, how you will see theyre both too long to wirte it like you propsed me! – John Smith Sep 26 '13 at 16:13
    
But generally i found your solution very intresting! – John Smith Sep 26 '13 at 16:14

Yes possible!

def pass1
  @user = 'Kras'
  @pass = 'zim'
  @country = 'DE'
end


def pass2
  @user = 'Hanna'
  @pass = 'Ooma'
end 

def foo
  puts @user
end 

[:pass1,:pass2].each do |sym|
   send(sym)
   foo
end

output

Kras
Hanna
share|improve this answer

You've got a really weird scenario going on here. What happens is [pass1, pass2] get evaluated and the results are what's populating the array, not your actual methods.

Your .each is then called against the results. Since pass2 sets @user = 'Hanna', you get the double output.

You can see that using the following code:

puts "#{[pass1, pass2]}" # => ["DE", "Ooma"]

The reason it is ['DE', 'Ooma'] is that Ruby always returns the result of the last statement in a method.


The proper way to write this code would be to remove the method calls from the array. That's bad form. But I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish, so you could achieve your result like so:

def pass1
  @pass = 'zim'
  @country = 'DE'
  @user = 'Kras'
end

def pass2
  @pass = 'Ooma'
  @user = 'Hanna'
end

[pass1, pass2].each do |user|
  puts user
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, So how should i write my loop? – John Smith Sep 26 '13 at 16:01
    
I updated my question with my original methods, how you will see theyre both too long to wirte it like you proposed me! – John Smith Sep 26 '13 at 16:12

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