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I have a three part date field I need to validate in angular js. I have got as far as creating a custom validation function, but I am having trouble designing the logic of how the fields should update each other's status.

How can I get all three form fields to sing off the same hymn sheet, and all show their status as either valid or invalid depending on the others?

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/4GsMm/1/

And code:

<div ng-app="myApp" ng-controller="myCtrl">
    <form action="" name="myForm">
        <div class="date-group">
            <input type="text" name="day" ng-model="day" ng-valid-func="validator" />
            <input type="text" name="month" ng-model="month" ng-valid-func="validator" />
            <input type="text" name="year" ng-model="year" ng-valid-func="validator" />
        </div>
    </form>
</div>

and...

input.ng-invalid{
    background-color: #fdd !important;    
}

input.ng-valid{
    background-color: #dfd !important;    
}

input{
    display: inline;
    width: 3em;
}

and...

var app = angular.module('myApp', [])

var myCtrl = function($scope){

    $scope.day = "01"
    $scope.month = "01"
    $scope.year = "2000"

    $scope.validator = function(val){
        var day = $('[name=day]').val()
        var month = $('[name=month]').val()
        var year = $('[name=year]').val()
        var d = new Date([year,month,day].join('-'))
        console.log(d, [year,month,day].join('-'))
        return d > new Date('2000-01-01')
    }

}

app.directive('ngValidFunc', function() {
  return {
    require: 'ngModel',
    link: function(scope, elm, attrs, ctrl) {
      ctrl.$parsers.unshift(function(viewValue) {
        if (attrs.ngValidFunc && scope[attrs.ngValidFunc] && scope[attrs.ngValidFunc](viewValue, scope, elm, attrs, ctrl)) {
          ctrl.$setValidity('custom', true);
        } else {
          ctrl.$setValidity('custom', false);
        }
        return elm.val()
      });
    }
  };
});
share|improve this question
1  
As an aside: You shouldn't be doing DOM manipulation, or even referencing it, outside of a directive. That JQuery stuff in your controller should be removed. Let model binding handle getting the data from the DOM and putting it into the scope. –  Ben Lesh Sep 26 '13 at 16:16
    
Second: How do you need to validate it? That it's a date? –  Ben Lesh Sep 26 '13 at 16:17
    
Fistly, I would like to put all the logic on model binding, but I have not yet figured out how to do that. Secondly, I am trying to make a scheme that will work with any validation, in this case something like that it is a date greater than 2000-01-01. –  Billy Moon Sep 26 '13 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

I too was looking for three part date field validation with AngularJS, here is what I did (working for me)

HTML:

<form name="myForm" method="post" novalidate ng-submit="somefuncion()" ng-controller="Controller" ng-app="testModule">
    Date (MM-DD-YYYY): <input id="partnerDOBmm" name="partnerDOBmm" class="ddinput" type="text" value="" size="2" maxlength="2" ng-model="partnerDOBmm" required only-digits ng-minlength="2" ng-change="validateDOB(partnerDOBmm,partnerDOBdd,partnerDOByyyy)"  />
    -
    <input id="partnerDOBdd" name="partnerDOBdd" class="ddinput" type="text" value="" size="2" maxlength="2" ng-model="partnerDOBdd" required only-digits ng-minlength="2" ng-change="validateDOB(partnerDOBmm,partnerDOBdd,partnerDOByyyy)" />
    -
    <input id="partnerDOByyyy" name="partnerDOByyyy" class="yyyyinput" type="text" value="" size="4" maxlength="4" ng-model="partnerDOByyyy" required only-digits ng-minlength="4" ng-change="validateDOB(partnerDOBmm,partnerDOBdd,partnerDOByyyy)" />
    <br />
    <span class="error" ng-show="submitted && (myForm.partnerDOBmm.$error.required || myForm.partnerDOBdd.$error.required || myForm.partnerDOByyyy.$error.required)"> Required! </span>
    <span class="error" ng-show="submitted && (myForm.partnerDOBmm.$error.minlength || myForm.partnerDOBdd.$error.minlength || myForm.partnerDOByyyy.$error.minlength)"> Too Short! </span>
    <span class="error" ng-show="notValidDate && !(myForm.partnerDOBmm.$error.required || myForm.partnerDOBdd.$error.required || myForm.partnerDOByyyy.$error.required || myForm.partnerDOBmm.$error.minlength || myForm.partnerDOBdd.$error.minlength || myForm.partnerDOByyyy.$error.minlength)"> Not a Valid Date! </span>
    <br />
    <button type="submit" class="btnSubmit" ng-click="submitted=true">Submit</button>
</form>

Script:

function Controller ($scope) {
    $scope.notValidDate = false;
    $scope.somefuncion = function(event) {
        if ($scope.myForm.$valid) {
            alert("Form is working as expected");
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            alert("Something is not correct");
            return false;
        }
    };
    $scope.validateDOB  = function(mm,dd,yyyy)
    {
        var flag = true;
        var month = mm;
        var date = dd;
        var year = yyyy;
        if(month == null || date == null || year == null || month.length != 2 || date.length!= 2 || year.length!= 4)
            flag = false;
        if(month < 1 || month > 12)
            flag = false;
        if(year < 1900 || year > 2100)
            flag = false;
        if(date < 1 || date > 31)
            flag = false;

        if((month == 04 || month == 06 || month == 9 || month == 11) && (date >= 31))
            flag = false;

        if(month == 02)
        {
            if(year % 4 != 0)
            {
                if(date > 28)
                    flag = false;
            }
            if(year % 4 == 0)
            {
                if(date > 29)
                    flag = false;
            }
        }

        var dob = new Date();
        dob.setFullYear(year, month - 1, date);
        var today = new Date();
        if(dob > today)
            flag = false;

        if(flag)
        {
            $scope.notValidDate = false;
            $scope.myForm.$valid = true;
        }
        else
        {
            $scope.notValidDate = true;
            $scope.myForm.$valid = false;
            form.partnerDOBmm.focus();
        }
    }
}

angular.module('testModule', [])
.directive('onlyDigits', function () {

    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        require: '?ngModel',
        link: function (scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
            if (!ngModel) return;
            ngModel.$parsers.unshift(function (inputValue) {
                var digits = inputValue.replace(/[^\d]/g, "");
                ngModel.$viewValue = digits;
                ngModel.$render();
                return digits;
            });
        }
    };
});

Feel free to improvise the answer, hopefully you can use 'else' in 'validateDOB' function

share|improve this answer

Realistically, you're better off just using input type="number" and max and min validators, and adding an ng-change directive that calls a function to update the date.

Since the change isn't fired if the content of the input is invalid, you'll never get a "bad" date:

<input type="number" name="year" ng-model="year" min="2000" ng-change="updateDate()"/>
<input type="number" name="month" ng-model="month" min="1" max="12" ng-change="updateDate()" />
<input type="number" name="day" ng-model="day" min="1" max="31" ng-change="updateDate()" />

Here's a plunk illustrating this solution.

However using text boxes for the month and the day are potentially bad solutions, as it will become a lot more complicated make sure than the day value is kosher. (Think about February and leap year for example). For this whole solution I would recommend using a drop down for the days at the very least, and probably for the month too... as there is a fixed set of results necessary, and you can show or hide the day options based on the value of the month option.

Here's an example of that:

<form name="myForm">
    <input type="number" name="year" ng-model="year" min="2000" ng-change="updateDate()"/>
    <select name="month" ng-model="month" ng-change="updateDate()">
      <option value="1">Jan</option>
      <option value="2">Feb</option>
      <option value="3">Mar</option>
      <option value="4">Apr</option>
      <option value="5">May</option>
      <option value="6">Jun</option>
      <option value="7">Jul</option>
      <option value="8">Aug</option>
      <option value="9">Sep</option>
      <option value="10">Oct</option>
      <option value="11">Nov</option>
      <option value="12">Dec</option>
    </select>
    <select name="day" ng-model="day" ng-change="udpateDate()">
      <option>1</option>
      <option>2</option>
      <option>3</option>
      <!-- ... SNIP!... -->
      <option>27</option>
      <option>28</option>
      <option ng-show="month != 2 || !(year % 4)")>
        29
      </option>
      <option ng-show="month != 2">
        30
      </option>
      <option ng-show="month == 1 || month == 3 || month == 5 || month == 7 || 
          month == 8 || month == 10 || month == 12">
        31
      </option>
    </select>
    <p>
      {{date | date: 'yyyy-MMM-dd'}}
    </p>
  </form>

But, but why not dynamically create those selects?

Could you dynamically create the above selects? Sure. Is it worth it? Maybe? Probably not. It only took 30 seconds to type up the options along with the show/hyde logic.

And here's that example in a plunk.

In both of the above scenarios you can just validate on the year validation for 2001:

<span ng-show="myForm.year.$error.min">Must be after January 1, 2001</span>
share|improve this answer

I had a very similar problem. The thing is, you probably don't want to check the fields in relation to one another. If you do that, it is quite difficult to establish if the date is actually valid, for example if it's not 30th of February. What you want to do is check the date as a whole, through an intermediary element.

As a side note - by design the controller should not be involved in this kind of activity. Validation should be done on directive level, so it is reusable and consistent with Angular, giving you benefits of validator chains. For example if you need to check just a valid date, but in another you need to check date of birth for age, then you would end up "wetting" your code :)

I came up with a reasonably simple solution, that fits nicely in Angular philosophy. The trick is to use intermediary form element (hidden input for instance) which pulls together all three dropdowns and performs validation on the whole date in one go.

Here's HTML, for setting focus:

<form name="dateForm" novalidation>
  <input type="hidden"
      ng-model="modelDate"
      date-type-multi="viewDate"
      ng-init="viewDate = {}"
      class="form-control"
  />
  <select ng-model="viewDate.day">
    <option value="">select day</option>
    <option value="1">1</option>
    <option value="2">2</option>
    <option value="3">3</option>
    <option value="4">4</option>
    <option value="5">5</option>
    <option value="6">6</option>
    <option value="7">7</option>
    <option value="8">8</option>
    <option value="9">9</option>
    <option value="10">10</option>
    <option value="11">11</option>
    <option value="12">12</option>
    <option value="13">13</option>
    <option value="14">14</option>
    <option value="15">15</option>
    <option value="16">16</option>
    <option value="17">17</option>
    <option value="18">18</option>
    <option value="19">19</option>
    <option value="20">20</option>
    <option value="21">21</option>
    <option value="22">22</option>
    <option value="23">23</option>
    <option value="24">24</option>
    <option value="25">25</option>
    <option value="26">26</option>
    <option value="27">27</option>
    <option value="28">28</option>
    <option value="29">29</option>
    <option value="30">30</option>
    <option value="31">31</option>
  </select>
  <select ng-model="viewDate.month">
    <option value="">select month</option>
    <option value="1">1</option>
    <option value="2">2</option>
    <option value="3">3</option>
    <option value="4">4</option>
    <option value="5">5</option>
    <option value="6">6</option>
    <option value="7">7</option>
    <option value="8">8</option>
    <option value="9">9</option>
    <option value="10">10</option>
    <option value="11">11</option>
    <option value="12">12</option>
  </select>
  <select ng-model="viewDate.year">
    <option value="">select year</option>
    <option value="1981">1981</option>
    <option value="1982">1982</option>
    <option value="1983">1983</option>
    <option value="1984">1984</option>
    <option value="1985">1985</option>
    <option value="1986">1986</option>
    <option value="1987">1987</option>
    <option value="1988">1988</option>
    <option value="1989">1989</option>
    <option value="1990">1990</option>
    <option value="1991">1991</option>
    <option value="1992">1992</option>
  </select>
</form>

And the JS code:

angular.module('dateApp', []).
  directive('dateTypeMulti', function() {
    return {
      priority: -1000,
      require: 'ngModel',
      link: function(scope, elem, attrs, ngModel) {
        ngModel.$render = function() {
          angular.extend(scope.$eval(attrs.dateTypeMulti), ngModel.$viewValue);
        };

        scope.$watch(attrs.dateTypeMulti, function(viewValue) {
          ngModel.$setViewValue(viewValue);
        }, true);

        ngModel.$formatters.push(function(modelValue) {
          if (!modelValue) return;

          var parts = String(modelValue).split('/');

          return {
            year: parts[0],
            month: parts[1],
            day: parts[2]
          };
        });

        ngModel.$parsers.unshift(function(viewValue) {
          var isValid = true,
            modelValue = '',
            date;

          if (viewValue) {
            date = new Date(viewValue.year, viewValue.month - 1, viewValue.day);
            modelValue = [viewValue.year, viewValue.month, viewValue.day].join('/');

            if ('//' === modelValue) {
              modelValue = '';
            } else if (
              date.getFullYear() != viewValue.year ||
              date.getMonth() != viewValue.month - 1 ||
              date.getDate() != viewValue.day) {
              isValid = false;
            }
          }

          ngModel.$setValidity('dateTypeMulti', isValid);

          return isValid ? modelValue : undefined;
        });
      }
    };
  });

It's important to set low priority on the directive, because that way the parser is fired as a first one (the work in opposite order to formatters) and other validators on this field will get parsed date.

You can play with it here: http://codepen.io/jciolek/pen/oxBch

The thought process in detail I have described here: http://float-middle.com/multiple-fields-validation-in-angularjs/

I hope it helps, Jacek

share|improve this answer

We add a directive to the last field and use $watchCollection in the directive as below (excuse coffeescript)

@validateDateDirective = ->
    require: "ngModel"
    link: (scope, elem, attr, ngModel) ->
        # Get the base model name without the _day _month _year appended
        # e.g for field 'birth_date_year', this would equal 'birth_date'
        modelName = attr.ngModel.replace('_day', '').replace('_month', '').replace('_year', '')

        # use base model name to watch all models in target fieldset
        scope.$watchCollection '['+modelName+'_day, '+modelName+'_month, '+modelName+'_year]', ->
            # Set global value
            value = [scope.$eval(modelName+'_year'),
                    scope.$eval(modelName+'_month'), 
                    scope.$eval(modelName+'_day')]

            # << do your validation here >>
share|improve this answer

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