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Consider the following base classes:

@interface ViewBase : UIView
@property (readonly) LayerBase *myLayer;
+ (Class)myLayerClass; // _myLayer = [[[self class] myLayerClass] new];
@end

@interface LayerBase : CALayer
@property AbstractGrid *grid;
@end

class AbstractGrid
{
public:
    int rows, columns;
    virtual someMethod() = 0;
}

I have a template Grid class that uses different cell types (AbstractGrid is needed because it's not possible to create template Objective-C classes):

template <class Cell>
class Grid : public AbstractGrid
{
public:
    Cell **cells;
    virtual someMethod() {}
}

Now I want to create a subclass of ViewBase that has type of myLayer also subclass of LayerBase (the +myLayerClass method is also redefined) and use different template parameter for the model class, for example:

@interface AView : ViewBase
@property (readonly) ALayer *myLayer;
@end

@interface ALayer : LayerBase
@property Grid<GridCell> *grid;
@end

class GridCell
{
public:
    int row, column;
}

The application works fine with this approach, but compiler gives me warnings about incompatible property types:

property type 'ALayer *' is incompatible with type 'LayerBase *' inherited from 'ViewBase'
property type 'Grid *' is incompatible with type 'AbstractGrid *' inherited from 'LayerBase'

While I can silence the first warning by declaring layer property with type id (which isn't the best solution as I can't use dot syntax without type casting, and I may make mistakes which compiler won't be able to catch):

@property (readonly) id myLayer;

I can't do the same with C++ type. Declaring the grid property as void * also doesn't help.

So is there a proper way to handle such situation? Or I should simply silence the warnings using pragmas since I know what I'm doing?

Please refrain from advising not to use C++ classes because it's not an option (I'm creating a set of cross-platform model classes to ease porting in future).

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Maybe see stackoverflow.com/questions/1365732/… A compounded class may save headaches compared to a multi-intheritance class in obj-c –  Jack Wu Sep 26 '13 at 16:26
    
I'm not using multiple inheritance, there's aggregation –  kambala Sep 26 '13 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

Yes. Don't alter the return type. For example:

@interface LayerBase : CALayer
- (AbstractGrid *)grid;
@end


@interface ALayer : LayerBase

// ALayer's local storage and typed interface:
@property Grid<GridCell>* grid_GridCell; // << use unique selector names

// ALayer's abstract interface/overrides:
- (AbstractGrid *)grid; // << returns self.grid_GridCell

@end
share|improve this answer
    
It means creating 'fake' ivars which seems rather stupid to me... Also, it's going to break unified grid access for subclasses. The goal is to make compiler know real class of grid property at compile time. –  kambala Sep 26 '13 at 19:03
1  
@kambala if all you need is the interface of AbstractGrid, you can expose AbstractGrid and use a factory -- without the need for creating objc variants. this is no different from C++; downcasting in both languages requires a cast in both languages for good reason. if you need that type information statically, then you should use properly typed variables anyway, and your LayerBase would not hold the ivar. of course, you could also accomplish it dynamically using dynamic_cast<>. in objc, you should not alter the return type as in your example, for the same reason C++ forbids it. –  justin Sep 26 '13 at 19:28
    
Factory doesn't suit in my case because I set grid pointers for each LayerBase subclass from external model object. –  kambala Sep 26 '13 at 19:37
    
@kambala i understand your objective, but the language designers of both objc and c++ don't want you to have implicit downcasting for a reason, and also why the functions in question have unmatched signatures. if you want this type information, i recommend you preserve it and use templates (not in an objc interface), or dynamic_cast<> and AbstractGrid. the caveat to your answer is that the compiler doesn't have all the information; it only has enough to compile the program… –  justin Sep 26 '13 at 20:14
    
@kambala …this means that you will need to always introduce exact type information at the callsite in order to deal with the type, and it will be more difficult the deeper your class hierarchies grow. this becomes a problem because the compiler uses the return type of method of the variable you pass. if the objc type is not the same as declared, you will be holding a pointer to the wrong type. this also leads to ambiguous return types. the compiler may in the future realize what you are doing and call it out -- as your hierarchy grows, or as you include other LayerBase subtypes in a TU. (con –  justin Sep 26 '13 at 20:14

Well, I decided to remove the grid @property (since I don't need any property features like KVO in this case) in favor of good old getter/setter and simply cast return type in subclasses. clang is clever enough to allow dot syntax for arbitrary getters, so now I'm getting no warnings.

@interface LayerBase : CALayer {
    AbstractGrid *_grid;
}
- (AbstractGrid *)grid;
- (void)setGrid:(AbstractGrid *)grid;
@end

@implementation LayerBase
- (AbstractGrid *)grid {
    return _grid;
}

- (void)setGrid:(AbstractGrid *)grid {
    _grid = grid;
}
@end

@interface ALayer : LayerBase
- (Grid<GridCell> *)grid;
@end

@implementation ALayer
- (Grid<GridCell> *)grid {
    return (Grid<GridCell> *)[super grid];
}
@end
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