Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

EDIT: Seems that I sounded too annoyed in the first, here is a rework.

I'd like to create an URL constant, like so

public static final URL REMOTE_URL = new URL("http://example.com/");

But I can't since the constructor throw a checked exception. Right now I use

public static final URL REMOTE_URL = createUrl("http://example.com/");

private static URL createUrl(String url) {
    try {
        return new URL(url);
    } catch (MalformedURLException error) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(error.getMessage(), error);
    }
}

But it feel like reinventing the wheel. I can't possibly be the only one who want to use a URL constant no? So I was wondering if there is third-party toolbox library (like guava or apache-commons, or something else, anything) or even better, something in standard Java that include this facilities? That would help me when we start a new project by reducing the size of our util package :) .

share|improve this question
5  
So, you know the exception is there for a reason, and you know the reason, and how Java checked exceptions work, so are you expecting a miracle here? If you know the exception won't occur, don't catch it. The compiler doesn't know this and can't possibly know this. – millimoose Sep 26 '13 at 18:19
    
I believe you can instruct compiler to ignore them using some annotation @ – d'alar'cop Sep 26 '13 at 18:20
1  
Declare your method to throw the exception. I can't imagine that this would affect much, given the very narrow usage described. – Joe Coder Sep 26 '13 at 18:22
3  
Some people get their panties in a bunch over the oddest things ;) Personally, I'm just grateful that Java has a notion of "checked" exceptions, and enforces it. Unlike C++, for example... – paulsm4 Sep 26 '13 at 18:28
1  
I think your little utility, with some commenting to explain why it eats the checked exception, is the way to go. If you put it into a class called "URLS" it will even sound like a Guava class. :-) – user949300 Sep 26 '13 at 18:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since everyone else is just commenting, I will provide the answer which is that no there is no standard way to do what you want :)

Also, since you mention apache commons and google guava, I would point out that standard is not exactly the correct word to use either....maybe you want open-source, free, or just third-party.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I fixed my question. – Laurent Bourgault-Roy Sep 26 '13 at 18:40

You cant extend URL because it is final, but you can create a new class, perhaps named MyURL, and have it proxy the URL methods to a private (or protected) URL member.

Here is the beginnings of such a class:

package blammo.url;

import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.net.URL;

public class MyURL
{
    private URL containedURL;

    public MyURL(final String spec)
    {
        try
        {
            containedURL = new URL(spec);
        }
        catch (MalformedURLException exception)
        {
            throw new RuntimeException(exception);
        }
    }

    public String getAuthority()
    {
        return containedURL.getAuthority();
    }

    // required for stuff that needs a URL class.
    public URL getContainedURL()
    {
        return containedURL;
    }
}

share|improve this answer

Just throwing this one in the mix - there's a lot of stylistic variation for accomplishing the same thing, this one initializes in a static init block, but it can't be final.

public static URL g_url;

static {        

    try {
        g_url = new URL("http://www.example.org");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.