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I can compile PHP etc... but I am trying to make it portable so all the paths to the modules, php.ini file are self-contained and portable.

But I noticed that after I compile using something like

configure --prefix=.../ --eprefix=.../
make && make install

The PHP executable actually searches for php.ini or other files using the absolute path instead of the relative paths.

Any ideas?

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1 Answer

You do realize Linux portability comes from compiling the source? Make should resolve everything so after compilation, you have a system specific binary.

If you want binary portability, look into yum or RPMs.

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hmm... I understand what you are saying. Let me put it this way. My grandmother has no idea about computers... all she wants to do is execute the line php -v and her life will be complete. Since I am her awesome grandson, here is what I will do. I will compile the PHP in a single self-contained folder and give her the copy. So, all she has to do is run cd /custom/path/to/php && ./php -v from the command line and everyone is happy. I want to avoid Yum, RPMs. –  roosevelt Sep 27 '13 at 4:40
    
Honestly then she should be using windows, and a self contained windows binary. I was a build monkey on a project with linux compatibility. We ended up recompiling the application on each system that we were targeting. If you want to dig into php's make, you might be able to find a solution: stevehanov.ca/blog/index.php?id=97 –  Byron Whitlock Sep 27 '13 at 21:07
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And also, if you put the php.ini in the same directory as the php binary, it will look there first. –  Byron Whitlock Sep 27 '13 at 21:08
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