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All my research has lead to there is no standard way to do this, but someone must have this lying around in some way or another.

Long story short, I need an (effective, i know it doesn't exist) std::readline with timeout. I'd prefer a cross platform way, but I'm actually writing for windows so I'll take that if nessisary. I allready have a boost dependency, so I don't mind using boost.

My forays down the path of boost::asio always seem to end in dead ends: for example:

How to asynchronously read input from command line using boost asio in Windows?

The conclusion seems to be that you just can't use the stdin handle with that solution.

Anyone got a better way?

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Ryan Dahl has written a substantial piece on this topic. –  Kevin A. Naudé Sep 26 '13 at 20:04
    
Yeah, so you will need to extract the OS "HANDLE" value from the stream. For stdio you would use fileno() and _get_osfhandle(). Then, from a 2nd thread you could call CancelIoEx(). The trick is coordinating with that 2nd thread to make the timeout work. Each time you read you would have to tell the 2nd thread to restart the timeout. –  joeking Sep 26 '13 at 20:08
    
@joeking I'm not sure that knowing the handle will actually be enough to make it work. Unless I am mistaken, the object that lies beneath STDIN on Windows is an anonymous pipe, and those don't support any form of non-blocking IO. I am interested in this -- can you confirm that your suggestion works? –  Kevin A. Naudé Sep 26 '13 at 20:13
    
@joeking Oh, I see what you are suggesting. However, if you need to use another thread to call CancelIoEx, isn't it better to just do the IO in another thread anyway? –  Kevin A. Naudé Sep 26 '13 at 20:18
    
I cannot confirm - I've not tried it myself - but CancelIoEx. Oh I forgot something that is better.... Get the HANDLE, then call WaitForSingleObject(h, timeout). When Wait returns success you can read from the handle without blocking. Now, fstream adds layers of buffering so you will need to disable the buffering to get the read operation to directly read from the OS handle. –  joeking Sep 26 '13 at 20:19

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