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I don't think my syntax is actually bad here. Or is it? This is my first stab at OpenFL.

The Haxe is not compiling correctly? Am I missing a compiler directive? Do I actually have a syntax error in this function? Syntax checker in Flashdevelop says no.

Here's the command:

Running process: C:\Program Files (x86)\FlashDevelop\Tools\fdbuild\fdbuild.exe "C:\dev\Haxe\TestOpenFL\OpenFLTest.hxproj" -ipc 2e4ace78-45b9-4868-a2dd-cf2c35265f44 -version "3.0.0" -compiler "C:\HaxeToolkit\haxe" -library "C:\Program Files (x86)\FlashDevelop\Library" -target "flash"

src/Main.hx:32: characters 16-17 : Unexpected ; Build halted with errors (haxelib.exe).

function init() 
{
    if (inited) return;
    inited = true;

    //           \/ says this semicolon is unexpected. wtf 
    for (var i = 0; i < 200; i ++)
    {

        var bmd = new BitmapData( 100, 100, true, 0xff0000ff);
        var bmp = new Bitmap( bmd);

        addChild(bmp);

        bitmaps.push( bmp );            
    }

    addEventListener( Event.ENTER_FRAME, onEnterFrame );
}

Here's the whole script. I can't for the life of me figure out why it would error there. If I comment out just the loop, it compiles just fine.

class Main extends Sprite 
{
var inited:Bool;    
var bitmaps:Array<Bitmap>;

/* ENTRY POINT */   
function resize(e) 
{
    if (!inited) init();
    // else (resize or orientation change)
}

function init() 
{

    bitmaps = new Array();

    if (inited) return;
    inited = true;

    for (var i = 0; i < 200 ; i ++)
    {
        // Assets:
        var bmd = new BitmapData( 100, 100, true, 0xff0000ff);
        var bmp = new Bitmap( bmd);

        addChild(bmp);

        bitmaps.push( bmp );            
    }

    addEventListener( Event.ENTER_FRAME, onEnterFrame );
}

private function onEnterFrame(e:Event):Void 
{
}




/* SETUP */

public function new() 
{
    super();
    addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, added);
}

function added(e) 
{
    removeEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, added);
    stage.addEventListener(Event.RESIZE, resize);
    #if ios
    haxe.Timer.delay(init, 100); // iOS 6
    #else
    init();
    #end
}

public static function main() 
{
    // static entry point
    Lib.current.stage.align = flash.display.StageAlign.TOP_LEFT;
    Lib.current.stage.scaleMode = flash.display.StageScaleMode.NO_SCALE;
    Lib.current.addChild(new Main());
}

}

share|improve this question
    
I don't know Haxe specifically, but you should try declaring i outside the loop (so that there is no var in the loop). I've known some parsers to have issues with that. –  Dave Sep 26 '13 at 21:32
    
Actually, see here: haxe.org/ref/syntax#for –  Dave Sep 26 '13 at 21:33
    
Heh, ok. My syntax is completely wrong for an iterator then. P.S. I tried declaring the i outside the loop, which led to other errors. –  FlavorScape Sep 26 '13 at 22:48
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First thing: have a look at the Haxe syntax page, it will help you for a lot of your futur problems.

Next, the for in Haxe is a bit tricky, it's kind of a foreach, so you use it like this:

for(myElem in elements){
    // loop here
}

Where elements implements Itarable (like an Array, a GenericStack or a Map). But if you want to increment a variable, you can create an Iterable by using the operator .... So, to take your code as an example:

for(i in 0...200){
    // loop here
}

Here, i will take as a value all the int between 0 and 200 (excluded).

share|improve this answer
    
On a side note, i guess since both ... and old fashioned loop syntax are ok by the Flashdevelop syntax checker, I wonder if that setting can change in FD. Guess that's another question altogether. –  FlavorScape Sep 27 '13 at 19:57
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Complete noob problem. Dove right in instead of reading the doc (which is the best way to learn, IMHO).

You can't use loops in Haxe. You have to use iterators.

for (i in 0...200)
{
         //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's still a for loop, just not the "plain-old" c-style taste. –  Andy Li Sep 27 '13 at 10:45
    
But doesn't an iterator rely on the type to determine the next() operator? while(setIterator.hasNext()){..} vs a loop that will execute the iteration regardless of the list? –  FlavorScape Sep 27 '13 at 16:16
    
Hm, not sure what goes on under the hood, but perhaps the ... operator is saying, "don't use the iterator" whereas e4x syntax for(x in y ) uses the iterator. –  FlavorScape Sep 27 '13 at 16:21
    
What I mean is, we generally think of "loop" as some kind of repeatation. There are several types of loops, and the use of iterator is one of them. The "plain-old" c-style for is another type of loop. Implementation-wise, Haxe's a...b is typed as an IntIterator, but the loop will be compile to a plain while loop. But anyway, it is certainly a loop. –  Andy Li Sep 29 '13 at 9:00
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