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I am trying to store more than 1 data item at a single index in my linked-list. All of the examples in my textbook seem to illustrate adding only 1 piece of data per index. I'm assuming it is possible to add more?

For example, using the Collections API to store an integer I would do the following:

LinkedList <Integer>linky = new LinkedList<Integer>();
int num1 = 2, num2 = 22, num3 = 25, num4 = 1337;
linky.add(num1);

How would I go about adding num2, num3, and num4 to the same first index in the list? Thanks guys.

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

There seems to be a little confusion about how linked lists work. Essentially, a linked list is composed of nodes, each of which contains one datum (an object, which itself can contain several member variables, to be precise), and a link to the next node in the list (or a null pointer if there is no such next node). You can also have a doubly-linked list, where each node also has a pointer to the previous node in the list, to speed up certain kinds of access patterns.

To add multiple "pieces of data" to a single node sounds like adding several links off of one node, which turns your linked list into an N-ary tree.

To add multiple pieces of data onto the end of the list, in the manner most commonly associated with a linked list, just do:

LinkedList <Integer>linky = new LinkedList<Integer>();
int num1 = 2, num2 = 22, num3 = 25, num4 = 1337;
linky.add(num1);
linky.add(num2);
linky.add(num3);
linky.add(num4);

Alternately, if you want each node of the linked list to have several pieces of data

These data should be packaged up into an object (by defining a class that has them all as member variables). For example:

class GroupOfFourInts
{
   int myInt1;
   int myInt2;
   int myInt3;
   int myInt4;

   public GroupOfFourInts(int a, int b, int c, int d)
   {
     myInt1 = a; myInt2 = b; myInt3 = c; myInt4 = d;
   }
}

class someOtherClass
{

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    LinkedList<GroupOfFourInts> linky = new LinkedList<GroupOfFourInts>();
    GroupOfFourInts group1 = new GroupOfFourInts(1,2,3,4);
    GroupOfFourInts group2 = new GroupOfFourInts(1337,7331,2345,6789);
    linky.add(group1);
    linky.add(group2);
  }
}

Now, linky will have 2 nodes, each of which will contain 4 ints, myInt1, myInt2, myInt3, and myInt4.

Note

None of the above is specific to linked lists. This pattern should be used whenever you want to store a bunch of data together as a unit. You create a class that has member variables for every piece of data you want to be stored together, then create any Java Collections type (ArrayList, LinkedList, TreeList, ...) of that type.

Be sure that you want to use a linked list (as there's no penalty in terms of programming difficulty in choosing an ArrayList or TreeList). This will depend on your data access pattern. Linked lists provide O(1) addition and deletion, but O(n) lookup, whereas ArrayLists provide O(1) lookup, but O(n) arbitrary add and delete. TreeLists provide O(log n) insertion, deletion, and lookup. The tradeoffs between these depend on the amount of data you have and how you're going to be modifying and accessing the data structure.

Of course, none of this matters if you'll only have, say, <100 elements in your list ;-)

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
oh okay, so you're saying I can create an object which contains all of the integers I need, and then store that single object in the node. I think that's what Nelson was saying too. – VeePee Oct 10 '08 at 7:23
    
haha, you updated it right as I commented. Thank you so much for your help! Very clear answer. – VeePee Oct 10 '08 at 7:27
    
I don't plan on having more than 25 elements in the list. I am trying to implement this into a Tic Tac Toe 5x5 board game to be able to undo moves. 25 is the max number of moves per game so it shouldn't be a problem. Thanks for the big O notation info, we were just covering that in class today :) – VeePee Oct 10 '08 at 7:40
    
Nice post; much clearer then mine :) but I would caution you: don't assume that because you have few elements in your collection that it does not matter which implementation you use. O(n) lookups will cause a big penalty if you decide to use it in say, a game loop when random access is an option :) – nlaq Oct 11 '08 at 6:59
    
Agreed, everything matters when you're in a tight loop, but if it's not on the critical path of your program, and the difference between O(1) and O(n) is < 1 order of magnitude, it's usually not worth a great deal of thought.Once your profiler tells you otherwise, then it's time to choose wisely :-) – Matt J Oct 11 '08 at 17:26

Use a structure.

For example:

private struct Node
{
    int Num1;
    int Num2;
    int Num3;
}

...

LinkedList<Node> list = new LnkedList<Node>();

Node n = new Node();
n.Num1 = 10;
n.Num2 = 100;
n.Num3 = 1000;
list.Add(n);

Note; I assume this is in C#; correct me if I'm wrong and I will fix the code ;)

If you have not gone over OOP yet in your book - then I would recommend giving it a try; it will help you solve problems like this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks but this is for java hehe – VeePee Oct 10 '08 at 7:18
    
You can use a class instead of a struct ~ so not a problem! – Gregor Oct 10 '08 at 7:20
    
Meh... One of the few mainstream languages I have never touched... I should though, eventually. – nlaq Oct 10 '08 at 7:21
    
You won't find too many differences, I've never written a line of C# in my life but I can read it just fine ;-) – Matt J Oct 10 '08 at 7:24
    
How to traverse the nodes in this case. can you please tell me.. i am implementing something similar to this. – Raj Nov 22 '12 at 4:06

Why not something like that:

LinkedList<LinkedList<Integer>> linky = new LinkedList<LinkedList<Integer>>();
//...
linky.add(new LinkedList<Integer>().add( //...
share|improve this answer

Like Nelson said you need another Object, in Java though you need to use a Class. If you need the 'Node' Class to be used outside the Class you're working in, then you need to make it a Public class, and move it to it's own file.

private Class Node
{
    //You might want to make these private, and make setters and getters
    public int Num1;
    public int Num2;
    puclic int Num3;
}

LinkedList<Node> list = new LnkedList<Node>();

Node n = new Node();
n.Num1 = 10;
n.Num2 = 100;
n.Num3 = 1000;
list.Add(n);

Apologies to Nelson for stealing his code ;)

share|improve this answer
    
How to traverse the nodes in this case. can you please tell me.. i am implementing something similar to this. – Raj Nov 22 '12 at 4:07

Here's a complete code sample that shows the use of adding a structure to a linked list:

import java.util.LinkedList;
class Node {
    int num1;
    int num2;
    int num3;
    int num4;
    public Node(int a, int b, int c, int d) {
        num1 = a; num2 = b; num3 = c; num4 = d;
    }
}
public class dummy {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LinkedList <Node>linky = new LinkedList<Node>();
        x myNode = new Node(2, 22, 25, 1337);
        linky.add(myNode);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I don't really understand what you are trying to achieve, so I suggest a solution to another reading of the problem (in java).

LinkedList <Integer>linky = new LinkedList<Integer>();
linky.add(num1);

// Lots of code possibly adding elements somewhere else in the list

if (linky.size() > 0) { // Always good to be sure; especially if this is in another methode
 int first = linky.get(0);
 linky.set(0, first + num2);// Value of linky.get(0) is num1 + num2 
}


// The same again
// Lots of code possibly adding elements somewhere else in the list

if (linky.size() > 0) { // Always good to be sure; especially if this is in another methode
 int first = linky.get(0);
 linky.set(0, first + num3); // Value of linky.get(0) is num1 + num2 + num3
}

I personally happen to like Nelson's solution best if the amount of numbers to add is constant (num1 .. num4), and if it is not constant I would prefer Gregor's solution (who uses a List in stead of a Node). If you go for the Node method in java I suggest:

// added static, Class to class
private static class Node
{
    //You might want to make these private, and make setters and getters
    public int Num1;
    public int Num2;
    puclic int Num3;
}

// Prefer interfaces if possible
List<Node> list = new LinkedList<Node>();

Node n = new Node();
n.Num1 = 10;
n.Num2 = 100;
n.Num3 = 1000;
list.add(n); // Add -> add

Lot's of nitpicking, but I think a static class in stead of a none-static private class is preferred if possible (and it normally should be possible).

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