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I have a Rails app with 4 models. I only access these 4 models in one controller action each. I currently have 4 different controllers to handle these models. I am wondering if it is bad practice that I stuff these 4 actions into one controller.

Current Setup:

class GmDataController < ApplicationController
    def dashboard
      @data = GmData.all
    end
end

class GmRetentionController < ApplicationController
    def dashboard
      @data = GmRetention.all
    end
end

class GsDataController < ApplicationController
    def dashboard
      @data = GsData.all
    end
end

class GsRetentionController < ApplicationController
    def dashboard
      @data = GsRetention.all
    end
end

Proposed Setup:

class DashboardController < ApplicationController
    def gm_data_dashboard
      @data = GmData.all
    end

    def gm_retention_dashboard
      @data = GmRetention.all
    end

    def gs_data_dashboard
      @data = GsData.all
    end

    def gs_retention_dashboard
      @data = GsRetention.all
    end
end
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Ryan Bigg, zakinster, Tony Miller, Nija, ppeterka Sep 27 '13 at 13:44

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Hard to say from here, I'm not seeing what you are getting for going off the rails –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 26 '13 at 22:51
2  
Marked the question to close as "Primarily opinion based" because it really depends on if there's going to be more than just this information in those actions. –  Ryan Bigg Sep 26 '13 at 22:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unless you have a really good reason, you should stick to the conventional names like index, new, show and so on. What is dashboard? It looks exactly like index to me. Remember you can make the path to the index action called whatever you want by manipulating the routing table, but internally it should be consistent and follow convention to ensure it's maintainable.

As a note, your controllers are rarely this trivial except in the very beginning. Over time you'll add things like pagination, searching, filtering, sorting, and a bunch of other code that will make your omni-controller really awkward.

Don't worry about creating tiny controllers. That's a good thing. Having a one-to-one correlation between model and controller eliminates a lot of confusion about who's responsible for that particular model.

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TL;DR

Do I need a controller for each model?

No, not necessarily. However, having one controller per RESTful resource is a convention for a reason, and you should carefully analyze why that convention isn't meeting your needs before doing something completely different.

Think "Resources," Not Controllers

You appear to be conflating RESTful resources with the Rails implementation of MVC. As a general rule, your controller should contain actions related to a resource. If your application treats a "Dashboard" as a resource, then a single DashboardController might certainly make sense if you're performing RESTful actions on a Dashboard object of some kind.

Conventions Aren't Laws of Physics

Rails uses a lot of conventions in order to map resources in a RESTful way, but sometimes those conventions don't match real-world applications. In such instances, you might find that one controller can handle all the actions you need, or that a single model might serve the needs of multiple controllers.

However, before you bollix up all your MVC layers, it's often useful to spend some time thinking about whether you have conceptually captured the correct resource model for your application. Is your resource really a Dashboard object? Does a Dashboard object really need a Dashboard#gs_data method to represent its behavior, or would GsData#index be semantically more meaningful?

In the end, you don't even have to use Rails in a RESTful way if you don't want to do so. However, you really ought to have a better reason (from an object-oriented analysis viewpoint) than you've laid out in your original question above.

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Simply 2 points here:

  1. You need a controller just when you have request actions on the relative model;
  2. When a model is just for data calculation and basic business logic implementation, don't generate the controller.
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