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For short, simple pieces of code, Futures (dart), or Promises (js), seem to offer a vaguely useful solution to the horrors of callbacks.

With large software the problem arises when for example, the server you are talking to starts returning junk, triggering a hitherto unseen exception buried deep in third party code. At this point, somewhere in an incredibly long chain of .then's, terminated with a catchError you will be the lucky recipient of something like new "Null pointer exception.". Where did it come from? Who knows? Obviously we don't magically get a call stack using these techniques, and there is no trace information that is of any use - some particular function may be called 50 times in this huge chain, and on some arbitrary invocation, an error is raised.

What strategies are best employed when confronted with this situation?

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Well, for one, don't have a long series on then's followed by catchError. Structure your code so that you perform error checking in a way that catches errors close to origin. –  Shailen Tuli Sep 27 '13 at 16:19
    
The problem is, once you start composing libraries that use promises you often wind up with a long series of thens- each layer of library building a longer chain, (unless I'm mistaken). By using catchError at the perimeter of a library call I suppose you could manually wrap the error and create a huge 'trace' at the end, hopefully with some information, but there's no guarantee that some library somewhere doesn't do the classic equivalent of rethrowing an error and losing stack information (in this case, everyone has to play the same game of building a trace). Am I missing something here? –  Matt Sep 27 '13 at 17:23
    
No, you're not missing anything, and you can't do much about how others' libraries are structured. But you can structure your own code to have .then().catchError() pairings, instead of having a long series of then() calls fallowed by a catchError() call. –  Shailen Tuli Sep 27 '13 at 17:28
    
Hmm. I suppose the next problem would be- if my library does a catchError, if I attempted to build a trace, I could very feasibly ruin your outer library, by wrapping an error in a way you don't expect. It seems that futures/promises at this stage don't handle errors particularly well, as discussed here: groups.google.com/a/dartlang.org/d/topic/misc/x-LynnxPYDU/…. It seems that the general principle could be improved on, but we're not there yet. This makes betting the farm on nodejs or dart quite a scary prospect in production for now. –  Matt Sep 27 '13 at 18:01
    
I think you want Zones, which are moving out of experimental. api.dartlang.org/docs/releases/latest/… –  Seth Ladd Sep 27 '13 at 22:28
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

An upcoming feature called Zones should help here. Also, check out getAttachedStackTrace.

This example prints "inside of catchError":

import 'dart:async';

void main() {
  runZonedExperimental(() {
    new Future.value(1)
      .then((v) => v)
      .then((v) => throw new ArgumentError('testing'))
      .then((v) => v)
      .catchError((e) => print('inside of catchError'));
  },
  onError: print);
}

This example prints 'in onError':

import 'dart:async';

void main() {
  runZonedExperimental(() {
    new Future.value(1)
      .then((v) => v)
      .then((v) => throw new ArgumentError('testing'))
      .then((v) => v);
  },
  onError: (e) => print('in onError'));
}

This example printed "in onError: Illegal argument(s): testing":

import 'dart:async';

void main() {
  runZonedExperimental(() {
    new Future.value(1)
      .then((v) => v)
      .then((v) => throw new ArgumentError('testing'))
      .then((v) => v);
  },
  onError: (e) => print('in onError: $e'));
}

This example prints out the stack trace, which contains the file and line number where the original exception occurred:

#0      main.<anonymous closure>.<anonymous closure> (file:///Users/sethladd/dart/zoneexperiment/bin/zoneexperiment.dart:7:20)

The code:

import 'dart:async';

void main() {
  runZonedExperimental(() {
    new Future.value(1)
      .then((v) => v)
      .then((v) => throw new ArgumentError('testing'))
      .then((v) => v);
  },
  onError: (e) => print(getAttachedStackTrace(e)));
}

Zones should be moving out of experimental before 1.0.

The docs for getAttachedStackTrace: http://api.dartlang.org/docs/releases/latest/dart_async.html#getAttachedStackTrace

The docs for runZoned: http://api.dartlang.org/docs/releases/latest/dart_async.html#runZonedExperimental

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