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The title's most likeley confusing, but let me elaborate.

I'm building a video game. I've searched all over the place for the answer to this, but it seems I can't get anything to work with my code. I have two classes: one for the main method, and another for the JFrame:

RunGame.java:

package net.naprav.wardungeon;

import java.awt.Canvas;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.image.BufferStrategy;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.awt.image.DataBufferInt;

public class RunGame extends Canvas implements Runnable {
private static final long serialVersionUID = 1203994186653691379L;

private static final int WIDTH = WindowFrame.WIDTH;
private static final int HEIGHT = WindowFrame.HEIGHT;
private static final Dimension size = WindowFrame.size;

private Thread thread;
public boolean isRunning = false;

public static int FPS = 0; //Frames per second.
public static int TPS = 0; //Ticks per second. (Updates per second)

public static String frames;
public static String updates;

private BufferedImage image = new BufferedImage(WIDTH, HEIGHT, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);
private int[] allPixels = ((DataBufferInt) image.getRaster().getDataBuffer()).getData();

//static Key key;
RenderSystem system;

/**
 * Added the main constructor.
 */ 
public RunGame() {
    this.setVisible(true);
    this.setSize(size);
    this.setPreferredSize(size);
    this.setMinimumSize(size);
    this.setMinimumSize(size);

    system = new RenderSystem(WIDTH, HEIGHT);
}

/**
 * Responsible for the logic behind the game.
 */
public void tick() {

}

/*
 * Responsible for the actual rendering behind the game.
 */
public void render() {
    BufferStrategy buffer = this.getBufferStrategy();

    //Clearing the screen to make room for the pixels! :D
    system.clearScreen();
    //Rendering the pixels in the RenderMechanism class.
    system.changePixels();
    for (int counter = 0; counter < allPixels.length; counter++) {
        //Setting the pixels in this class to the ones in RenderMechanism.java.
        allPixels[counter] = system.allPixels[counter];
    }

    //Buffer is automatically null, so we can create one to render a number of buffers. (3)
    if (buffer == null) {
        this.createBufferStrategy(3);
        return;
    }

    //Graphics setup.
    Graphics gfx = buffer.getDrawGraphics();
    gfx.setColor(new Color(146, 17, 189));
    gfx.fillRect(0, 0, this.getWidth(), this.getHeight());
    //Draw stuffs between here...
    gfx.drawImage(image, 0, 0, this.getWidth(), this.getHeight(), null);
    //and here.
    gfx.dispose();
    buffer.show();
}

/**
 * Used to start the thread and make it go! :D
 */
public synchronized void begin() {
    thread = new Thread(this);
    thread.start();
    isRunning = true;
}

/**
 * Used to end the thread and make it stop! :/
 */
public synchronized void finish() {
    if (isRunning == true) {
        isRunning = false;
        try {
            thread.join();
        } catch (InterruptedException exc) {
            System.out.println("Couldn't join thread! :(");
            exc.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}   


/**
 * The run method is used to run the game itself in the thread.
 */
public void run() {
    long previousTime = System.nanoTime();
    long secondTimer = System.currentTimeMillis();

    final double nanoSeconds = 1000000000.0 / 60.0;
    double omega = 0;

    while (isRunning == true) {
        long currentTime = System.nanoTime();
        omega += (currentTime - previousTime) / nanoSeconds;
        previousTime = currentTime;

        while (omega >= 1) {
            this.tick();
            TPS++;
            omega--;
        }

        this.render();
        FPS++;

        if ((System.currentTimeMillis() - secondTimer) > 1000) {
            secondTimer += 1000;
            //Un-comment out below code for console output of frames and updates.
            frames = String.valueOf(FPS);
            updates = String.valueOf(TPS);
            System.out.println(frames + ", " + updates);
            FPS = 0;
            TPS = 0;
        }
    }
    this.finish();
}

/**
 * The Main method.
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    WindowFrame window = new WindowFrame("WarDungeon", FPS, TPS);
    //Get rid of '//' below to test the login screen!
    //LoginScreen login = new LoginScreen("WarDungeon Login");
}
}

The code above is for running the game with a thread. I add the RunGame.java class (extends Canvas) to the WindowFramejava class:

package net.naprav.wardungeon;

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;

import javax.swing.ImageIcon;
import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class WindowFrame extends JFrame {
private static final long serialVersionUID = 1203994186653691379L;

public static final int WIDTH = 330;
public static final int HEIGHT = 200;
public static final int SCALE = 3;
public static final Dimension size = new Dimension(WIDTH * SCALE, HEIGHT * SCALE);

private ImageIcon icon;

RunGame game;

public WindowFrame(String title) {
    this.setTitle(title);
    this.setSize(size);
    this.setVisible(true);
    this.setResizable(true);
    this.setLocationRelativeTo(null);

    icon = new ImageIcon("res/wardungeon_logo.png");
    this.setIconImage(icon.getImage());

    game = new RunGame();

    this.add(game);
    game.begin();

    this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
}

public WindowFrame(String title, int frame, int update) {
    this.setTitle(title + " | " + "FPS: " + frame + ", UPS: " + update);
    this.setSize(size);
    this.setVisible(true);
    this.setResizable(true);
    this.setLocationRelativeTo(null);

    icon = new ImageIcon("res/wardungeon_logo.png");
    this.setIconImage(icon.getImage());

    game = new RunGame();

    this.add(game);
    game.begin();

    this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
}
}

I know this is a lot of code, and I apologize. I am still a noob in Java coding, but if you could help me with this, that would be great. My main problem is that I can't get the FPS and TPS to show on the title bar. I don't know how to get that variable to change without affecting the "per second" of the frames and updates.

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

Short answer: you need to call .setTitle(...) on the JFrame from the run() method periodically somehow (probably in place of the System.out.println you've got there). This is the only way to keep the title bar up-to-date.

Just from a cursory overview of your code, it looks like you will need to do some refactoring, as there is no reference to the JFrame from the RunGame class. Instead of having the JFrame be the "master" that contains the RunGame instance, maybe reverse it, and have RunGame control the JFrame.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks for the help! I think it might work! –  Naprav Specif. Sep 27 '13 at 0:24
    
IHMO - RunGame should have as little concept about it's running environment as it can, as it makes it more flexible and provides more opportunity for deployment choices... –  MadProgrammer Sep 27 '13 at 0:27
    
That is a good point @MadProgrammer. However, I would argue that someone somewhere needs to (a) have access to the FPS information contained in RunGame, (b) have access to the JFrame that it is running in, and (c) be hooked into the run loop in RunGame. Furthermore, RunGame is (I expect?) going to be a singleton whose whole purpose in life is to manage that JFrame. For a small application like this, it seems reasonable to slip on elegance and have that functionality in RunGame rather than bloat the code with extra interfaces and delegate classes. Just an opinion though! –  Calvin Sep 27 '13 at 0:41
    
I don't disagree with your point, but I might argue is is a good learning opportunity to try and use good practices wherever possible. It's a catch 22 and I spend more time flipping over it in my own personal code ... ;) - IMHO –  MadProgrammer Sep 27 '13 at 0:44

There's probably a few ways to do this...

The basic process is...

  • Find the parent window/frame
  • Parse the current title
  • Create the new title
  • Update the window title...

For example...

while (isRunning == true) {
    /*...*/

    if ((System.currentTimeMillis() - secondTimer) > 1000) {
        frames = String.valueOf(FPS);
        updates = String.valueOf(TPS);
        /*...*/
        Window parent = SwingUtilities.windowForComponent(this);
        if (parent instanceof Frame) {
            Frame frame = (Frame)parent;
            String title = frame.getTitle();
            String title = value.substring(0, value.indexOf("|")).trim();
            title = title + " | " + "FPS: " + frame + ", UPS: " + update;
            frame.setTitle(title);
        }
    }
}

The problem I have with this approach is that it suddenly tightly couples your RunGame to Frame...

While this might not seem like a big deal, if you want to re-use the component or deploy it it some other means, it will, potentially, break the application

A better solution would be to define a interface that has some kind of method that RunGame can call (like get/setTitle for example)...

For example...

public interface GameContainer {
    public String getTitle();
    public void setTitle();
}

Then WindowFrame could implement this interface...

public class WindowFrame extends JFrame implements GameContainer {...}

And RunGame would require an instance...

public class RunGame extends Canvas implements Runnable {
    /*...*/
    private GameContainer gameContainer;
    public RunGame(GameContainer gameContainer) {
        this.gameContainer = gameContainer;

You would then use this instance to make the changes you...

    if ((System.currentTimeMillis() - secondTimer) > 1000) {
        frames = String.valueOf(FPS);
        updates = String.valueOf(TPS);
        /*...*/
        if (gameContainer != null) {
            String title = gameContainer.getTitle();
            String title = value.substring(0, value.indexOf("|")).trim();
            title = title + " | " + "FPS: " + frame + ", UPS: " + update;
            frame.setTitle(title);
        }
    }

And finally, when you create the game, you would simply pass a reference of GameContainer to it...

game = new RunGame(this);

This now frees you to define GameContainer as you see fit...

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