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a = 0
b = 1
print a
print b
for i in range (102):
    c = a + b
    a = b
    b = c
    print c

print "The 103rd number is", c

I don't understand how the for statement works. I understand everything except how the program continues till the 103rd element and understands that it has to add the last two numbers to get the next number. I understand that a is equal to b and b is equal to c.

Is it because after adding c, it changes the vales of a and b then goes back to the for statement? And that is where I am confused. What does the program do next?

Does it go back to the for statement to check which (term)/element this is to make sure it is less then 102.

Also when I specify the range to be 102 does it do the action once and then 102 times more basically list the number 103 times) or does it do it 102 times)?

What I am basically asking is if I need to find the 103rd element why do i specify range=102, not range =103

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To specifically answer your question: no, the program doesn't check if anything is less than 102. What it does do is iterate over every element in a list that you dynamically create, with range(102). –  Bepetersn Sep 27 '13 at 1:42
    
This function gets called: docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#iterator.next –  Bepetersn Sep 27 '13 at 1:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's expand the for loop and see what happens:

a = 0    
b = 1     # this is the first fibonacci number

# First iteration of for loop
c = a + b # c is now 1, the second fibonacci number
a = b     # a is now 1
b = c     # b is now 1

# Second iteration
c = a + b # c is now 2, the third fibonacci number
a = b     # a is now 1
b = c     # b is now 2

# Third iteration
c = a + b # c is now 3, the fourth fibonacci number
a = b     # a is now 2
b = c     # b is now 3

# Fourth iteration
c = a + b # c is now 5, the fifth fibonacci number
a = b     # a is now 3
b = c     # b is now 5

# Remaining 98 iteration omitted

You see that after 4 iterations we have in c the 5:th fibonacci number. After 102 iterations c will hold the 103:d fibonacci number. That is why you are using range(102) and not range(103). If you wanted your fibonacci series to start with 0 (as it sometimes does), i.e. 0, 1, 1, 3, 5, you would need to use range(101).

The python for loop iterates over a sequence until the sequence is exhausted, or the for loop is prematurely exited with the break statement. range(5) creates a list of 5 elements: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], which, when used with the for loop, causes it to repeat 5 times. The loop body in the following example is therefore evaluated 5 times:

sum = 0

for i in range(5):
  sum = sum + i

print sum

We just calculated the fifth Triangle number: 10

More on python for loops: https://wiki.python.org/moin/ForLoop

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F0=0, F1=1, F2=1, F3=2, F4=3 ...

for i in range (102):
    c = a + b
    a = b
    b = c
    print c

Notice that in your first loop , c=a+b=0+1=F0+F1=F2, so the result you print is F2 not F1, thus F103 is printed in the 102nd loop.

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There are infinite uses of the for statement, for in your case, it just does whatever in it for 102 times. So, in your specific case, the for statement does...

c = a + b
a = b
b = c
print c

c = a + b
a = b
b = c
print c

c = a + b
a = b
b = c
print c

# ... (99 more times)

and when it is done, the program finishes with print "The 103rd number is", c, which you know what is happening.

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Does it go back to the for statement to check which (term)/element this is to make sure it is less then 102. And when i specify the range to be 102 does it do the action once and then 102 times more basically list the number 103 times) or does it do it 102 times) -What I am basically asking is if I need to find the 103rd element why do i specify range=102, not range =103 –  user2821664 Sep 27 '13 at 1:29
    
Yes, the for statement is in charge of checking whether it runs 102 times instead of 103. I'm not here to write a book, but here's something you can look at from creators of Python. –  Brian Sep 27 '13 at 1:32
    
Oh okay, when I set range =103 it prints the first 103 terms in the range including zero. Thank you! –  user2821664 Sep 27 '13 at 1:40

range is a function that returns a list of integers. If you specify a single argument n, you get all integers from 0 through n-1.

A statement of the form for x in y: <do something>, where y is iterable, iterates over every element in y. For each such element z, it binds the variable x to z and then executes the body of the loop one time.

So the line for i in range(102) executes everything inside the loop one for each integer between 0 and 101. NB: you aren't actually referencing the variable i inside your loop, so you could also write for _ in range(102).

Regarding the block inside the loop, it goes roughly like this:

  • set c equal to the sum of a and b
  • set a to the value of b
  • set b to the value of c

So each time you iterate, you find the next number, store it in c, and then update your state variables a and b. a and b hold the last two fibonacci numbers.

If you really want the 103rd fibonacci number, there is a bug in your program - do you see it?

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Yes I believe so, the range should be 103 because the first number is equal to the 0th number in the range and since I need it to print out the first 103 elements if I do 103 it will print the first 102 terms and the 0th term –  user2821664 Sep 27 '13 at 1:36

Examine:

for f in [1, 2, "foo"]:
    print f

Then recall that range(102) creates a list [1, 2, 3, ... 101, 102].

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This line will repeat anything below it that is indented 102 times.

for i in range(102):
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Of course it belongs here. This is where people can come to ask questions about programming. –  danben Sep 27 '13 at 1:26
    
I deleted "It is very basic Python, and I'm not exactly sure this question belongs on stackoverflow." from the answer, which is what danben was replying to. I was just not sure if this fell under "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved." –  James Robinson Sep 27 '13 at 1:32

Fibonacci's formula is :

f(n) = f(n-1) + f(n-2); (n > 1, n is integer)
f(0) = 0
f(1) = 1

And range(102) = [0, 1, 2, ..., 101]

so for i in range (102): means for loop runs 102 times

c = a + b
a = b
b = c

means b stand for f(n-1), and a stand for f(n-2), so c stand for f(n). the for loop runs 102 times to get the 103th element, because the loop is start with 2nd element.

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