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So, I'm developing an accordion plugin, and it's mostly done except for one bug where for the first few steps of the slideUp/slideDown, the accordion is 1px taller than it's meant to be, causing a visual bug. I've narrowed it down to the fact that the first step in the slideUp animation doesn't do anything, and I can't figure out why. Here's an example

HTML

<div style='height: 100px; background-color: red;' id='div1'>
</div>

<div style='height: 100px; background-color: blue; display: none;' id='div2'>
</div>

JS

console.log('Start');
var diff = 0;
var upNow = 100;
var downNow = 0;
$.fx.interval = 1000;
var duration = $.fx.interval * 100;
$("#div1").slideUp({ easing: 'linear', duration: duration, step: function(now)
{
    if(now != 0 && now > 90)
    {
        console.log("Slide Up: " + now);
        upNow = now;
    }
}});

$("#div2").slideDown({ easing: 'linear', duration: duration, step: function(now)
{
    if(now != 0 && now < 10)
    {
        downNow = now;
        diff = 100 - (upNow + downNow);
        console.log("Slide Down: " + now);
        console.log("Slide Difference:" + diff);
    }
}});

http://jsfiddle.net/hbh6U/

The problem is that I need these to be in sync, and I can't figure out why they're not, or how to get them in sync. One idea I've had is to skip the first step of the slideDown animation, but I'm not sure how to do that either. Has anyone got any ideas, or faced this bug before?

Thanks, Gareth

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+200

The problem comes down to this line in jQuery's internal defaultPrefilter method:

tween.start = prop === "width" || prop === "height" ? 1 : 0;

This causes the animation for the second div (from 1px to 100px) to be shorter than that of the first div (from 0 to 100px).

To solve this modify your step function like this:

function linearStep(now, animation){
    var animationStart = animation.start;
    if (animationStart === 1){
         animationStart = 0;   
    }
    animation.now = (animation.end - animationStart ) * animation.pos + animationStart;
}

It overwrites the calculated now value by doing the same calculation with a fixed animationStart, which is 0 instead of 1.

This will break if the animation actually starts at 1, but there'd be other ways to handle it then.

Side-by-side Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Nd3w2/3/

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Thank you, it caused me such a headache. I'm surprised at the functionality though, is it mentioned in the documentation anywhere? –  Gareth Parker Sep 30 '13 at 1:17
    
Didn't see anything in the docs, just kept stepping through the jQuery source. –  Matt Zeunert Sep 30 '13 at 6:51

i don't exactly know where is this issue coming from... Sunday morning... not too much time to investigate... But i found two possible solution based on your fiddle...

First one was to wrap these two DIVs in another DIV with overflow:hidden.

Second one... probably more appropriate is to call "slide" function only on one of the divs and then update the size of second one in callback, something like that:

console.log('Start');
var diff = 0;
var upNow = 100;
var downNow = 0;
$.fx.interval = 1000;
var duration = $.fx.interval * 100;
$("#div1").slideUp({ easing: 'linear', duration: duration, step: function(now)
{
    if(now != 0 && now > 90)
    {
        console.log("Slide Up: " + now);
        upNow = now;
    }

    $("#div2").height(100-  $("#div1").height());
}});

Also remove "disply:none" form div2 styles...

It fixes the issue and is a bit more elegant solution in my opinion... Calling two separate animation functions can lead to possible sync problems... Hope that helps...

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with the first one is that that's what we already do. My example was a simplistic version of an accordion plugin I've developed, and the overflow none is causing a bottom-border of lower content to be hidden. But I like your idea of the slide. I'll have to wait until tomorrow to try and implement it (it's for work), but if it works well, I'll be sure to accept your answer. Thanks for the insight –  Gareth Parker Sep 29 '13 at 13:43

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