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closed as off-topic by Mike W, PSL, random, JohnnyHK, djechlin Sep 27 '13 at 3:11

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Because it doesn't have to do type casting, so it knows faster if condition is true or false. –  elclanrs Sep 27 '13 at 2:52
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The links you posted don't really support your statement. The results show that on most browsers they are relatively equivalent, a few show == as faster, and a few show === as faster. –  bcorso Sep 27 '13 at 2:57
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Followup question: Why is the air slightly stickier in the living room than in the kitchen? The natural response to both questions is: Why the heck do you want to know that? –  Šime Vidas Sep 27 '13 at 2:59
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Nothing to do with the quesiton, but JS performance is so inconsistent across browsers. Not only that but it often defies common sense, such as regular expressions being faster to parse a string than performing a simple character per character parsing, mostly because some native methods are written in C where it executes faster. That's extremely annoying. –  plalx Sep 27 '13 at 3:06

3 Answers 3

Here's what javascript has to do for ===:

  1. If Type(x) is different from Type(y), return false.
  2. If Type(x) is Undefined, return true.
  3. If Type(x) is Null, return true.
  4. If Type(x) is Number, then
    1. If x is NaN, return false.
    2. If y is NaN, return false.
    3. If x is the same Number value as y, return true.
    4. If x is +0 and y is −0, return true.
    5. If x is −0 and y is +0, return true.
    6. Return false.
  5. If Type(x) is String, then return true if x and y are exactly the same sequence of characters (same length and same characters in corresponding positions); otherwise, return false.
  6. If Type(x) is Boolean, return true if x and y are both true or both false; otherwise, return false.
  7. Return true if x and y refer to the same object. Otherwise, return false.

And here's what it has to do for ==:

  1. If Type(x) is the same as Type(y), then
    1. If Type(x) is Undefined, return true.
    2. If Type(x) is Null, return true.
    3. If Type(x) is Number, then
      1. If x is NaN, return false.
      2. If y is NaN, return false.
      3. If x is the same Number value as y, return true.
      4. If x is +0 and y is −0, return true.
      5. If x is −0 and y is +0, return true.
      6. Return false.
    4. If Type(x) is String, then return true if x and y are exactly the same sequence of characters (same length and same characters in corresponding positions). Otherwise, return false.
    5. If Type(x) is Boolean, return true if x and y are both true or both false. Otherwise, return false.
    6. Return true if x and y refer to the same object. Otherwise, return false.
  2. If x is null and y is undefined, return true.
  3. If x is undefined and y is null, return true.
  4. If Type(x) is Number and Type(y) is String, return the result of the comparison x == ToNumber(y).
  5. If Type(x) is String and Type(y) is Number, return the result of the comparison ToNumber(x) == y.
  6. If Type(x) is Boolean, return the result of the comparison ToNumber(x) == y.
  7. If Type(y) is Boolean, return the result of the comparison x == ToNumber(y).
  8. If Type(x) is either String or Number and Type(y) is Object, return the result of the comparison x == ToPrimitive(y).
  9. If Type(x) is Object and Type(y) is either String or Number, return the result of the comparison ToPrimitive(x) == y.
  10. Return false.

Notice that if Type(x) equals Type(y) then the operators do the same thing. However, if they aren't, then the == might have to do various conversions whereas === just returns false.

For the links you gave, the types that are being compared are actually the same, so the two operators should perform about equally. Differences here would be based on implementation details - since they do different things, they can be optimized for differently. Theoretically, since === does less, one would think it would always be faster, but that doesn't appear to be the case for certain builds of Firefox, at least if those benchmarks are accurate.

However, see the difference if the types are different. When doing "hi" === {} you get ~66 million ops/second, but for "hi" == {} you only have ~4 million ops/second.

share|improve this answer
    
And therefore... –  user2736012 Sep 27 '13 at 2:58
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I dont think this was the question –  Pilot Sep 27 '13 at 2:58
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"There are many additional steps for the == vs. the ===..." Not necessarily. That's only true if the types are different. –  user2736012 Sep 27 '13 at 3:00
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@captain And what is the question? –  plalx Sep 27 '13 at 3:01
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@captain, I think the spec was self-explaning why the == could be slower than ===. –  plalx Sep 27 '13 at 3:17

JavaScript is a weakly typed language, so it will apply type coercion wherever possible.

Equals Operator

// These are true
new Number(10) == 10; // Number.toString() is converted
                      // back to a number

10 == '10';           // Strings gets converted to Number
10 == '+10 ';         // More string madness
10 == '010';          // And more 
isNaN(null) == false; // null converts to 0
                      // which of course is not NaN

The Strict Equality Operator

It works like the normal equality operator, except that strict equality operator does not perform type coercion between its operands.

""           ===   "0"           // false
0            ===   ""            // false
0            ===   "0"           // false
false        ===   "false"       // false
false        ===   "0"           // false
false        ===   undefined     // false
false        ===   null          // false
null         ===   undefined     // false
" \t\r\n"    ===   0             // false

The above results are a lot clearer and allow for early breakage of code. This hardens code to a certain degree and also gives performance improvements in case the operands are of different types.

So === faster than == in Javascript

Here is good Reference

share|improve this answer

=== compares if the values and the types are the same.
== compares if the values are the same, but it also does type conversions in the comparison. Those type conversions make == slower than ===.

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