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Hi everyone I am a newbie in C and trying to learn it. I have a simple query regarding this linkedlist implementation which I found at many places:

void addNode(node **listhead, int data, int pos){
        if(pos<=0 || pos > length(*listhead)+1){
                printf("Invalid position provided, there are currently %d nodes in the list \n", length(*listhead));
                return;
        }else{
                node *current = *listhead;
                node *newNode = (node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
                if(newNode == NULL){
                        printf("Memory allocation error\n");
                        return;
                }
                newNode->data = data;
                newNode->next = NULL;
                if (current == NULL){
                        *listhead = newNode;
                        return;
                }else{
                        int i = 0;
                        while(current->next != NULL && i < pos-1){
                                ++i;
                                current = current->next;
                        }
                        if(current->next == NULL){
                                current->next = newNode;
                        }
                        if(i == pos-1){
                                newNode->next = current->next;
                                current->next = newNode;
                        }
                }
        }
}




int main(){
        node *head = NULL;
        node **headref = &head;
        addNode(headref, 1, 1);
        addNode(headref, 2, 2);
        addNode(headref, 3, 3);
        printList(head);
        return 0;
    }

my query is here we are creating a pointer to a pointer which is pointing to NULL. This code works, however I wanted to know if this is a good practice. If it is not, how should I create my head pointer and pass its reference to the addNode function.

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3  
This is not a link list implementation. This is the usage of a linked list. And there's no problem with using NULL pointers (they're in the language for a reason), but it's hard to tell what all this is doing without more context and actual, relevant code. –  user529758 Sep 27 '13 at 4:41
1  
If you don't like headref, you can also use addNode(&head, 1, 1). In general, there isn't a specific bad practice about this code. –  Jim Lim Sep 27 '13 at 4:41
1  
I updated code with addNode function too. Thanks for responding, I think I understood, just have stupid fear of pointers. Thanks again. –  user1772218 Sep 27 '13 at 4:44
2  
@user1772218 - that's alright: C++ bigots often say lots of nasty things about pointers ;) –  paulsm4 Sep 27 '13 at 4:48
    
@paulsm4 Yup, and fortunately this is not C++ just plain ol' C, so it's completely valid and good practice to use pointers if necessary. –  user529758 Sep 27 '13 at 4:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suggested alternative:

int main() {
  node *head = addNode(NULL, 1, 1);
  node *current = head;
  current = addNode(current, 2, 2);
  current = addNode(current, 3, 3);
  printList(head);
  return 0;
}

In other words:

1) addNode() becomes a function that takes the current value as a parameter (so it doesn't have to traverse the entire list just to add a new element)...

2) ... and it returns a pointer to the new node.

3) This means at ANY point in the program you can access ANY of a) the list head, b) the previous pointer (before "add") and/or c) the next pointer (after add).

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Assuming addNode is re-written to return the added node rather than as an out-param? –  WhozCraig Sep 27 '13 at 4:45
1  
This is something I never thought of. thank god I asked. This is really good implementation. –  user1772218 Sep 27 '13 at 4:48
1  
@user1772218 it is a completely different design than yours. Yours is designed to take a list-head and insert a node a a specific position (think of it as an ordinal index). This does not, and the position parameter is useless unless used as a relative offset to the current node. –  WhozCraig Sep 27 '13 at 4:51
    
Yes, However I find it a good alternative design, I would not have thought of returning the pointer to the next node. I am learning and this is just a sample code. So It is good to learn an alternative method and use it when I don't have to bother about inserting a node in between, and just have to add a node in the end. –  user1772218 Sep 27 '13 at 4:56

We pass a double pointer to addNode() for cases, where the headref pointer needs to be updated. For such cases, with "addNode(headref, 1, 1);", the addNode would most likely be storing the address of the malloced element inside addNode() in the headref. If you were to pass headref as a pointer, then after the call headref would continue to point to the address in the main and you would lose the malloced address.

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For single linked list, it is actually a good practice, which simplifies the addNode implementation. I guess the call to addNode(node_x, 1, 1) will add a node before node_x. If you pass only the pointer to node_x. Then the function will need to loop over the entire list and find the node before node_x and modify its pointer to the new constructed node. While if you pass a pointer to pointer, let's say node** p then the function only needs to assign the address of the new node to *p.

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