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Say i have a text file like with several lines like this

H 2012/08/05 20 13   Homework 1
Q 2012/08/07 10 8.5  Quiz 1
L 2012/08/05 5  3    Lab 1 Attendance

The beginning letters represent (H) Homework, (Q or E) Quiz/Exam, and (L) Labs I want to read each value into a corresponding class variable and then sort them alphabetically before printing them out into their own categories: Here's the class i've set up.

class Assignment
{
 private:
        char Assignment_type;
        string Date;
        int Max_score;
        float Actual_score;
        string Assignment_name;
 public:
       Assignment();
}

Obviously i haven't written the functions to return the values or the default constructor yet, I really just need some help figuring out how to read from the file into the correct variables first.

Once read in i need to be able to sort them alphabetically before printing them out into their corresponding category's.

How do I sort this kind of data alphabetically after reading it into the correct variables?

share|improve this question
    
Using std::sort. :v –  rightfold Sep 27 '13 at 6:07
    
What 'value' you want to store into the class variable? –  MadeOfAir Sep 27 '13 at 6:09
    
Assignment_type = "H", Date = "2012/08/05", Max_score = "20", Actual_score = "13", Assignment_name = "Homework 1" for first line –  nastalgia Sep 27 '13 at 6:10
    
Why not go back re-read your class notes (or a text book, or an on-line tutorial). –  Ed Heal Sep 27 '13 at 6:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it with std::getline and std::istringstream and a few other standard library functionality:

class Assignment
{
    // ...

public:

    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Assignment& assignment)
    {
        std::string line;
        std::getline(is, line);

        std::istringstream iss(line);

        iss >> assignment.Assignment_type;
        iss >> assignment.Date;
        iss >> assignment.Max_score;
        iss >> assignment.Actual_score;

        // The last field is a little difficult, as it should get the rest
        // of the line, which can include spaces, and the `>>` operator
        // separates on spaces
        // Get the rest using `getline`
        std::getline(iss, assignment.Assignment_name);

        return is;
    }
};

Now you can do e.g.

std::ifstream input_file("data.txt");

Assignment assignment;

input_file >> assignment;

References:


For the other part, you should put the newly read Assigment objects in a collection like std::vector. Then you can use std::sort to sort them however you want:

std::vector<Assignment> assignments;

std::ifstream input_file("data.txt");
Assignment assignment;
while (input_file >> assignment)
    assignments.push_back(assignment);

std::sort(std::begin(assignments), std::end(assignments));

For the std::sort function to work, you have to implement a operator< for your assignment though:

class Assignment
{
    // ...

public:

    friend bool operator<(const Assignment& a, const Assignment& b)
    {
        return a.Assignment_name < b.Assignment_name;
    }
};

If you have a C++11 (or better) compatible compiler, then you can use lambda expressions (also see Wikipedia) when calling std::sort:

std::sort(std::begin(assignments), std::end(assignments),
    [](const Assignment& a, const Assignment& b)
    {
        return a.Assignment_name < b.Assignment_name;
    });

References:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. –  nastalgia Sep 27 '13 at 6:24
1  
You can chain the calls to >>, replace the copy() call with a getline(), and remove the default less argument to sort(). –  Jon Purdy Sep 27 '13 at 6:34
    
@JonPurdy Too early in the morning for me, but yeah I most definitely could. Will do after some breakfast or something. :) –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '13 at 6:36
    
For the final variable Assignment_name would "getline(is, a.Assignment_name);return is;" work? –  nastalgia Sep 27 '13 at 21:34
    
In std::getline(file_stream, line); What is file_stream referring too? wont it return a "not declared in this scope" error since i havent defined what it is? –  nastalgia Sep 27 '13 at 22:10

To read your data it seems like you should just do the normal thing

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Assignment& a)
{
    in >> a.Assignment_Type >>  a.Date >>  a.Max_score >> a.Actual_score;
    getline(in, a.Assignment_name);
    return in;
}

The only slightly tricky part is that your assignment name can contain spaces, so I've used getline to read that part.

This function would have to be a friend of Assignment in order to access its private variables.

class Assignment
{
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, Assignment& a);
    ...
};

As for sorting the data, just put it in a vector and call std::sort with a suitable sorting condition.

bool compare(const Assignment& x, const Assignment& y)
{
    return ...; // return true if x is 'less than' y alphabetically
}

std::vector<Assignment> data;
...
std::sort(data.begin(), data.end(), compare);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you john - insanely helpful - im having a problem using getline though, its simply reading nothing into a.Assignment_name. Any thoughts? –  nastalgia Sep 27 '13 at 23:52
    
@nastalgia Not immediately, getline reads everything from the current position in the file to the end of the line. When you get an error like this you must always consider that what's going wrong is not the reading of the assignment name but whatever you're doing to write it out. If you can't figure it out it sounds like a new question to me. –  john Sep 28 '13 at 6:21

you should do something like following, and store each token in corresponding class variable.

char buff[50]; char *temp;
while(in.getline(buff,50,'\n'))
    {


        Asignment_type = strtok(buff," ");

        int count = 4;
        while(count>0)
        {
            temp = strtok(NULL," ");

            count--;

        }

    }

1st token will give you assignment type, and inside inner while, each temp will give you further tokens, per line. you may store them in corresponding variables. (think of how you will store the complete assignment name). good luck.

share|improve this answer
1  
No no no! Don't do while (!in.eof()), it does not work as you expect and will loop once to many. The reason being that the EOF flag will not be set until after you try to read from beyond end-of-file. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '13 at 6:27
    
@JoachimPileborg Thanks. what do you mean by 'will loop once to many'? and what would you suggest as replacement in this case? –  Zeeshan Sep 27 '13 at 6:30
1  
For the last line, the getline call does not set the EOF flag. So the loop will continue, causing getline too fail (and now the EOF flag is set) but you still use the string as it contains valid data when it doesn't. Instead do e.g. while (in.getline(...)). –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '13 at 6:34
    
@JoachimPileborg Perfect! Thanks :) Edited :) –  Zeeshan Sep 27 '13 at 6:37

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