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I have the following try-catch statement and I do not want to not throw the exception if the message property contains 'My error' in the text.

How can I programmatcially accomplish this? Also, would this be considered code-smell?

try
{
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    if(e.Messages.Contains("My error"))
    {
       //want to display a friendly message and suppress the exception
    }
    else
    {
        throw e;
    }
}
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4  
This is a bad code smell. If you for whatever reason have to live with a framework, that only throws exceptions of the same type your code would do. But note that it is a difference whether you write throw e; or just throw; (normally you would want the latter). –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Dec 15 '09 at 0:30
5  
Another reason this smells bad: this technique prevents you from ever localizing the error string into other languages. Or, if you are looking for someone else's error string, they might change the string in the next version, or have a different string if they detect that the user is French, and so on. –  Eric Lippert Dec 15 '09 at 0:34
    
Yea this might actually be worse than when an ex-colleague replaced all of my catch (Exception e) with catch (Throwable t) in a heavily threaded Java application. –  jcm Dec 15 '09 at 0:35
    
@Eric I did that once by localizing the string being searched for. Still not a good idea. –  Joshua Dec 15 '09 at 2:29
    
It should be just throw;, never throw e;. –  Keith Feb 21 '13 at 11:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You should be catching the specific exception you're looking for. Quite frankly, that code is shocking. You should have something like ...

public class MyCoolException : Exception {
    public MyCoolException(string msg) : base(msg) {}
}

public void MyCoolMethod() {
    // if bad things happen
    throw new MyCoolException("You did something wrong!");
}

Then later in your code you can use it like ...

try {
    MyCoolMethod();
} catch (MyCoolException e) {
    // do some stuff
}
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+1 for shocking. Although, it's really not, I've seen it way too many times to be shocked by it anymore :) –  womp Dec 15 '09 at 0:35

You shouldn't catch errors based on the error test. You should make your own exception class that extends exception:

class MyErrorException : Exception { }

and throw and catch those. (Excuse my syntax if it's wrong, I haven't done C# in a while).

That being said, throwing and catching your own Exceptions instead of propagating them is perfectly normal, and it is how you actually should do exception handling.

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1  
+1 - but that's java notation, in C# it would be: class MyErrorException : System.Exception { } –  kiwipom Dec 15 '09 at 0:27
1  
Claudiu is right, never look at the message of the exceptio nto see if this is right. By the way Claudiu, the right syntax is a colon to derive a class: class MyException : Exception { }. ` –  Marcel Gosselin Dec 15 '09 at 0:28
2  
You (and all the other answerers so far) are assuming he controls the code which is throwing the exception. Is that definitely the case? –  itowlson Dec 15 '09 at 0:44
    
@itowlson: Would throwing a general Exception for every type of error with a different message be a good reason to ditch a foreign library? Maybe not the main reason but at least a con against using it. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Dec 15 '09 at 1:19
    
@itowlson: The code in the question does just that. We're just pointing out better ways. –  Claudiu Dec 15 '09 at 1:24

Your code creates maintainability issues because a simple text change can have strange side effects. You can have your own exception class which inherits from System.Exception. Then instead of having an if you could do the following:

try
{

}
catch(MyException myException) //or just catch(MyException)
{
    //display a friendly message
}

also you don't want to do throw e because it doesn't preserver the Stack, just throw; will do.

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2  
+1 for calling out the throw e statement as well. The correct way to rethrow an exception is simply throw;. –  Aaronaught Dec 15 '09 at 0:29
    
Can I get a reason for the downvote? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Dec 15 '09 at 0:40

When I throw Exception rather than a derived class I always mean a failed assertion. I don't like failing out the backend because we are still able to receive a request (just not that one again). If we're really toast it will just error out on the next request anyway.

When the back end needs to generate an error message I have a ErrorMessage class that inherits from Exception and takes ErrorMessage and ErrorMessageTitle as constructor arguments.

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