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I'm confused about some of these operations (combinding bitwise and logical ops).

If x = 0x3F and y = 0x75, find the byte value of the diff c expressions:

1) x&y
2) x | y
3) ~x | ~y
4) x & ~y
5) x && y
6) x || y
7) !x || !y
8) x && ~y

attempt

FIrst, I converted the hex to binary:

x = 00111111
y = 01110101

Here are my attemtps

1) 00110101
2) 01111111
3) 01111111
4) x & not y?  isn't the bang operator a logical operator?  what is the bit representation of !y?
5) x && y = TRUE = but how is that represented as a byte? 11111111?
6) x || y = how can this be represented as a byte?
7) !x || y = ???
8) x && ~y = ?????
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Your answer to 3 is wrong. ~x has a one for the first bit, so ~x | ~y must too. –  David Schwartz Sep 27 '13 at 7:34
    
Thanks. #3 11001010 –  user2756257 Sep 27 '13 at 7:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The logical not operator ! turns a "true" value into "false", and the other way around. And since any non-zero is considered "true" the operator simple returns zero for anything non-zero.

This leads to x & !y to be zero as masking anything with zero is zero.

The logical values for "true" and "false" are specified to be 1 and 0 respectively. This means that the result of a logical operator (i.e. && or || or the unary !) is always 1 or 0.

If you combine the two statements above, you get why using double logical-not (!!) (which you might have seen somewhere) always returns either 0 or 1.

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Ok, but what about for number 5? && is logical, so x && y returns true (as both are non-zero), but what is the bit-representation of the answer? 11111111? –  user2756257 Sep 27 '13 at 7:40
    
@JonSmith Read my answer again. Logical operations always returns 0 or 1. The bit-pattern of 0 is 0 and the bit-pattern of 1 is 1. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '13 at 7:41
    
TRUE = 00000001? –  user2756257 Sep 27 '13 at 7:43
    
@JonSmith Or 00000000000000000000000000000001 on a 32-bit machine. It doesn't matter how you slice it, one is always one, no matter how many zeroes you put in front, or which base (hex, binary, octal, 36) you use. You would not say the decimal value 1 is different from the decimal value 01, would you? –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 27 '13 at 7:44
    
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  user2756257 Sep 27 '13 at 7:55

7) !x || !y = 0

It's better to think in terms of TRUE and FALSE, for || operator.

 X = TRUE, y = TRUE 
 --> !x = FALSE
 --> !y = FALSE
 ----> FALSE OR FALSE = FALSE (0).
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And then x && ~y == TRUE && TRUE == TRUE? –  user2756257 Sep 27 '13 at 7:54
    
we're approaching :-). Yes. Just a note: you'd better write this way: –  graziano governatori Sep 27 '13 at 8:04
    
x && ~y --> TRUE && TRUE --> TRUE –  graziano governatori Sep 27 '13 at 8:05
    
actually, in c, "x && ~y == TRUE && TRUE == TRUE" it's a valid expression (the whole line itself!), if you put –  graziano governatori Sep 27 '13 at 8:06
    
#define TRUE 1 #define FALSE 0 –  graziano governatori Sep 27 '13 at 8:07

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