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I have a custom web app and the file structure works like this:

/apps/calendar/frontend/index.php
/apps/calendar/frontend/view/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/edit/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/add/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/view/index.php

I'm trying to write a .htaccess file to help redirect the files so they cant see the 'real' path.

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/admin
RewriteRule ^([^/\.]+)/(.*)/(.*)($|/$) /apps/$1/frontend/$2/$3 [NC,L]
RewriteRule ^([^/\.]+)/(.*)($|/$) /apps/$1/frontend/$2 [NC,L]
RewriteRule ^([^/\.]+)($|/$) /apps/$1/frontend/ [NC,L]

When I visit localhost/calendar it should map redirect to /apps/calendar/frontend/index.php. But when I visit localhost/calendar/add it gives me a 301 (permanent move) then shows the full page of localhost/apps/calendar/frontend/add/index.php in the console. Anyone got any ideas why this would happen? Or a better way around this? The apps might have heaps of sub-directories so, I'm not particularly keen on having a rule for ever subdirectory combination.

As you can see also I have a /admin path, which would load the /backend/ parts of the app. I would assuming I can do the similar code with the prefix of /admin?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This question might also be of your interest: Create blog post links similar to a folder structure.

Given that your .htaccess is located on the root folder of your domain /home/youraccount/public_html/.htaccess, it would look like this:

Options +FollowSymLinks -MultiViews

RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/(admin|apps) [NC]
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/apps/$1 -d
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/?(|.*)$ /apps/$1/frontend/$2 [NC,L]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/apps [NC]
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/apps/$1 -d
RewriteRule ^admin/([^/]+)/?(|.*)$ /apps/$1/backend/$2 [NC,L]

Let's say the user access:

http://domain.com/calendar
http://domain.com/calendar/
http://domain.com/calendar/add

All the above would redirect to

/apps/calendar/frontend/index.php
/apps/calendar/frontend/index.php/
/apps/calendar/frontend/index.php/add

And the if the user access:

http://domain.com/calendar/admin
http://domain.com/calendar/admin/
http://domain.com/calendar/admin/add

It would go to:

/apps/calendar/backend/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/index.php/
/apps/calendar/backend/index.php/add

So it would make index.php your controller for each end:

/apps/calendar/frontend/index.php
/apps/calendar/backend/index.php
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. Just some tweaks though to suit my app structure. The /frontend would be directly loaded by public users. While the /backend files are loaded via AJAX using $.load() inside pages of /admin. So it should be /admin/apps/calendar/index.php; /admin/apps/calendar/add –  Ourx Sep 27 '13 at 8:29
    
Sorry, also how can I allow the /index.php to load? Adding: RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^index.php [NC] to the conditions doesnt work for me. Any ideas? –  Ourx Sep 27 '13 at 8:35
    
/admin/apps/calendar/ but it would be accessed from http://domain.com/admin/calendar? With the current setup index.php would only show if you append it to the URL's on your HTML. –  Prix Sep 27 '13 at 8:50
    
Nice! Is it possible not to use a controller in /apps/calendar/frontend/index.php ? So if it were /calendar/add it would just redirect to /apps/calendar/frontend/add/index.php ? –  Ourx Sep 27 '13 at 9:05
    
Just an idea but try the update and see if that works like u want. –  Prix Sep 27 '13 at 9:08

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