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So trying to make a simulation of a coin toss game where you double your money if you get heads and half it if you have tales. And want to see what you get after n throws if you start with x money

However I'm not sure how to tackle this problem in a nice clean way, without just doing a forloop to n.

Is there some clean way to do this?

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2  
what about using sample? –  Jilber Sep 27 '13 at 8:30
    
Ok so I could use sample(c(0,1), n, replace = TRUE) to get my numbers. And then *2+0.5 and multiply with my x? –  Coolcrab Sep 27 '13 at 8:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use sample to create a list of times 0.5 and times 2.

sample_products = sample(c(0.5, 2), 100, replace = TRUE)
> sample_products
  [1] 0.5 2.0 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 2.0 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5
 [19] 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.5
 [37] 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0
 [55] 0.5 2.0 0.5 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.5 2.0 0.5 0.5 2.0 0.5 0.5
 [73] 0.5 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 0.5 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.5 0.5
 [91] 2.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 0.5

and to get the cumulative effect of those products:

cumulative_prod = prod(sample_products)

and include the start money:

 start_money = 1000
 new_money = cumulative_prod * start_money

Note that for larger sampling sizes, cumulative_prod will converge towards 1, for a fair coin (which sample is).

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cumulative_prod will NOT converge to 1! The simple random walk converges in distribution to a normal distribution. Since you are multiplying instead of adding, cumulative_prod will converge in distribution to a log-normal distribution centered at 1. –  shadow Sep 27 '13 at 9:17
    
Whe are getting into semantics a bit here, in the text above I refer to converge to 1 as that the expected value equals 1. I think for this small example it is sufficient to keep it that way and not get lost in statistical jargon. –  Paul Hiemstra Sep 27 '13 at 9:39
    
That's fine. I was just pointing out that if you use an unfair coin, e.g. sample(c(0.5,2), Nsims, replace=TRUE, prob=c(.51,.49)), then the product does converge to 0 a.s., which may be interesting when considering this example. –  shadow Sep 27 '13 at 9:52

You can loop over this if you want to run multiple iterations

n = 10

toss <- round(runif(n),0)
toss[toss == 0] = -1
toss <- 2^toss

Reduce(x = toss,'*')
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This is not the best way (I'm sure there are a lot of better ways to do it), nevertheless, you can consider it as a very starting point to understand how to do it

> set.seed(1)
> x <- 100   # amount of money
> N <- 10    #number of throws
> TH <- sample(c("H", "T"), N, TRUE)  # Heads or Tails, drawin "H" or "T" with same probability
> sum(ifelse(TH=="H", 2*x, 0.5*x)) # final amount of money
[1] 1100

Also you can write a function that takes as argument the initial anount of money x and the number of trials N

> head.or.tails <- function(x, N){
   TH <- sample(c("H", "T"), N, TRUE)  # Heads or Tails
   sum(ifelse(TH=="H", 2*x, 0.5*x)) # final amount of money  
 }
> 
> set.seed(1)
> head.or.tails(100, 10)
[1] 1100

In order to avoid the ifelse part, you can write sample(c(0.5, 2), 100, replace = TRUE) instead of sample(c("H", "T"), N, TRUE), see @Paul Hiemstra answer.

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If you're starting to get your head around this sort of thing, I'd be tempted to work in log space, i.e. add one for a win and subtract one for a loss. You can sample as others have done, i.e. @Paul's answer.

y <- sample(c(-1,1), 100, replace=TRUE)
plot(cumsum(y), type="s")

if you want to convert back to "winnings" you can just do:

plot(2^cumsum(y)*start_money, type="s", log="y", xlab="Round", ylab="Winnings")

this will look very similar, but the y-axis will be in winnings.

If you're new to stochastic processes such as this, it can be interesting to see lots of "winning" or "losing" streaks. If you want to see how long they are, the rle function can be useful here, for example:

table(rle(y)$len)

will print the frequencies of the lengths of these runs, which can get surprisingly long. You could play with the negative-binomial distribution to see where this comes from:

plot(table(rle(y)$len) / length(y))
points(1:15, dnbinom(1:15, 1, 0.5), col=2)

although you'll probably need to work with larger samples (i.e. 1000 samples or more) to see the same "shape".

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