Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have function

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        $("#search").click(function() {
            var text = $("#searchText").val();
            $.getJSON("Search", { world: text, filter: text }, function(data) {
                $("tr.DataRow").toggle(false);
                for (i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
                    $("#obj" + data[i]).toggle(true);
                }
            });
        })            
    });


</script>

now i have another function

<script type="text/javascript">

    $(function() {
        $('#searchText').bind('keypress', function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {

            }
        });
    });
</script>

how can i call first function from second function?

share|improve this question
10  
@kusanagi It is considered proper courtesy to mark the correct answers to your questions as "accepted". You have asked 11 questions, so it will be very easy to go back through them and accept all the correct answers. This will encourage people to answer your questions fully and without reservation. –  Doug Neiner Dec 15 '09 at 1:39
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can raise a click event on the element you registered the first function

<script type="text/javascript">

    $(function() {
        $('#searchText').bind('keypress', function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                $('#search').click(); // Raise a click event on #search element
            }
        });
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the simplest solution to the question asked. Great answer! –  Doug Neiner Dec 15 '09 at 1:37
add comment

Extract the logic from the first event handler into a named function:

function doSearch() {
    var text = $("#searchText").val();
    $.getJSON("Search", { world: text, filter: text }, function(data) {
        $("tr.DataRow").toggle(false);
        for (i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
            $("#obj" + data[i]).toggle(true);
        }
    });
}

You can now pass doSearch by name to the click handler:

    $(function () {
        $("#search").click(doSearch);
    });

and explicitly invoke it from within the key handler:

    $(function () {
        $('#searchText').bind('keypress', function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                doSearch();
            }
        });
    });
share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct way to go –  PetersenDidIt Dec 15 '09 at 3:01
    
... except that you've polluted the global namespace instead of extending the jQuery object. –  Pointy Dec 15 '09 at 13:38
    
@Pointy - If you start treating the jQuery object as a de facto global namespace, you'll run into the same problems as making all your variables global. What happens when we write the function each()? –  harto Dec 15 '09 at 21:40
    
Besides, we aren't writing a plugin here. It makes no sense to modify the jQuery object. I also happen to think there's nothing inherently wrong with using the global namespace for user applications. –  harto Dec 15 '09 at 21:41
    
Plus this is only hitting the global namespace if it's declared outside any other functions. For basic situations if this code only needs to be re-used within a single page (eg if an number of events need to call the same custom animation on a page) then it will probably already be within a closure inside the $(document).ready(function(){.....}) If it needs to be reused more widely then turn it into a plugin and give it it's own file. –  benz001 Jun 13 '11 at 4:14
add comment
// first function
$(function() {
  $.yourFavoriteFunctionName = function() {
    // the code for the first function
  };
  $.yourFavoriteFunctionName();
});

then

// second function
$(function() {
  // whatever
  if (foo)
    $.yourFavoriteFunctionName();
share|improve this answer
add comment

you could give it a name? am I missing something?

edit: to get this right

<script type="text/javascript">
function() myfunction{
    var text = $("#searchText").val();
    $.getJSON("Search", { world: text, filter: text }, function(data) {
        $("tr.DataRow").toggle(false);
        for (i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
            $("#obj" + data[i]).toggle(true);
        }
    });
}

$(function(){
    $("#search").click(myfunction);
});
</script>

and then

<script type="text/javascript">

$(function() {
    $('#searchText').bind('keypress', function(e) {
        if (e.keyCode == 13) {
            myfunction();
        }
    });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
That will not work. When you instantiate a function as part of an expression, giving it a name will provide a way for the function to call itself recursively, but it will not set up that name as an attribute of the window object (or any other object). –  Pointy Dec 15 '09 at 1:31
    
@RamboNo5 All myfunction() is triggering is the event binding of the #search element, not the click action itself. –  Doug Neiner Dec 15 '09 at 1:42
    
Ok thanks! I edited thhe code. Now it should work as expected right? Your solution is much more slick, though :) –  RamboNo5 Dec 15 '09 at 1:43
    
@RamboNo5, basically, to follow your approach, you need to empty take the contents of the #search anonymous function, and put them into myfunction(), then use this to bind it to #search : $("#search").click(myfunction); And then whether you call myfunction or click the #search element, the same function will run. –  Doug Neiner Dec 15 '09 at 1:46
    
Alright, that makes sense. A repeated binding of the click event is kinda superfluously. –  RamboNo5 Dec 15 '09 at 1:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.