Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to search for last occurrence of the pattern in the file and delete everything after the line containing last pattern. I wonder if its possible using awk or sed. thanks in Advance.

aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
eeeeee fffff gggg
qqqq eeee rrrr 

desired output:

aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

tac to the rescue:

$ tac b | awk '/pattern/ {p=1}p' | tac
aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd

Another example:

$ cat a
aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
eeeeee fffff gggg
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
qqqq eeee rrrr
$ tac a | awk '/pattern/ {p=1}p' | tac
aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
eeeeee fffff gggg
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
share|improve this answer
    
worked for me thanks –  user2809888 Sep 27 '13 at 11:31
1  
Also: tac a | sed -n '/pattern/,$p' | tac –  William Pursell Sep 27 '13 at 11:37
    
what if I want to search for first pattern and delte everything above it including the pattern line ? –  user2809888 Sep 27 '13 at 12:23
1  
@user2809888 this is what you asked before: stackoverflow.com/questions/19047312/… –  fedorqui Sep 27 '13 at 12:25
awk '
    BEGIN { ARGV[ARGC++] = ARGV[ARGC-1] }
    NR==FNR { if (/pattern/) lastLine = NR; next }
    { print }
    FNR == lastLine { exit }
' file

To demonstrate how postfix works above (see comments below):

$ awk 'BEGIN{ i=3; a[i++] = i; for (j in a) print j, a[j]; print i }'
3 3
4
share|improve this answer
    
I can always learn things from your answer, I think this time too. Can you explain the begin block? I knew that here we want to read the input file twice by append a ARGV. but this line I cannot understand: ARGV[ARGC++] = ARGV[ARGC-1] say, we have awk '..' file then we have ARGC=2; V[0]=awk; V[1]=file now we do V[ARGC++]... then we assign V[2]=something now the ARGC is 3. the right side, ARGV[ARGC-1] is actually V[3-1] but V[2] is empty. why after ARGC++ didn't change the ARGC? –  Kent Sep 27 '13 at 15:12
1  
@Kent the only "tricky" part is that ++ is a postfix operator and so doesn't occur until AFTER the whole statement is evaluated so it's equivalent to ARGV[ARGC] = ARGV[ARGC-1]; ARGC++, i.e. ARGC retains its original value until after the assignment. –  Ed Morton Sep 27 '13 at 15:17
    
@Kent I updated my answer just to show how postifx works in a small script. –  Ed Morton Sep 27 '13 at 15:25
1  
thank you so much, I tested it a bit just now awk 'BEGIN{x=5;a[x++]=x;print a[5]}' it printed 5, not 6. it is interesting. not like other programming languages. good to know. thank you for the answer and the explanation. +1, ++1 ;) –  Kent Sep 27 '13 at 15:30
    
I suspect the difference might be related to interpreted vs compiled languages. If I could get my awkcc to work, it'd be an interesting test! –  Ed Morton Sep 27 '13 at 16:16

I have this line, should work for your requirement:

awk '/pattern/{_=NR}{a[NR]=$0}END{for(i=1;i<=_;i++)print a[i]}' file

I did a small test:

kent$  cat f
aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
eeeeee fffff gggg
qqqq eeee rrrr 
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
111
222

kent$  awk '/pattern/{_=NR}{a[NR]=$0}END{for(i=1;i<=_;i++)print a[i]}' f
aaaaaa bbbbb cccccc
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
eeeeee fffff gggg
qqqq eeee rrrr 
aaaaaa pattern dddddd
share|improve this answer
1  
@fedorqui I found that too.. now it should give the right thing. –  Kent Sep 27 '13 at 11:36
1  
@user2809888 stackoverflow.com/questions/19047312/… –  Kent Sep 27 '13 at 12:42
2  
@Jotne You can have your own opinion for sure. I agree with you, _ doesn't look like other common var names, easy to be read, but personally I don't think the answer deserves a downvote, even if it could be written better. 1) it works 2) corner cases were considered as well 3) _ is a valid variable name in awk. that is, we can use it. 4) the _ is underscore, for me it looks like the Lastline in a file. so I used it. Would you vote awk down too (if you could) since awk allows a var named _ ? Or you can suggest, when should we use the var name _? –  Kent Sep 27 '13 at 13:44
2  
+1 as downvoting this is too touchy –  fedorqui Sep 27 '13 at 14:15
1  
I can not remove the downvote. I agree its a valid character, but a simple b would do. –  Jotne Sep 27 '13 at 21:34

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r '/pattern/{x;/./p;d};x;/./!{x;b};x;H;$!d;x;P;d' file
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.