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I need to convert a wide string to double number. Presumably, the string is holding a number and nothing else (maybe some whitespaces). If the string contains anything else, an error should be indicated. So I can't use stringstream - it will extract a number without indicating an error if the string contained something else.

wcstod seems like a perfect solution, but it works wrong on Android (GCC 4.8, NDK r9). What other options can I try?

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1  
Use std::stod it throws exception in case of bad input. –  M M. Sep 27 '13 at 13:08
    
"it will extract a number without indicating an error if the string contained something else." Huh? If the extraction fails, failbit should be set. (If you enable stringstream's exceptions, you'll get an exception as well.) –  dyp Sep 27 '13 at 13:09
    
@MM.: It's a wrapper around strtod, I believe, and my input is wide string. –  Violet Giraffe Sep 27 '13 at 13:09
    
@DyP: if it fails an exception will be thrown BUT there is no error with this string, and I need an error here: "123 asf". –  Violet Giraffe Sep 27 '13 at 13:11
1  
Get the source and fix the wcstod for Android –  Neil Sep 27 '13 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use stringstream, then use std:ws to check that any remaining characters on the stream are only whitespace:

double parseNum (const std::wstring& s)
{
    std::wistringstream iss(s);
    double parsed;
    if ( !(iss >> parsed) )
    {
        // couldn't parse a double
        return 0;
    }
    if ( !(iss >> std::ws && iss.eof()) )
    {
        // something after the double that wasn't whitespace
        return 0;
    }
    return parsed;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << parseNum(L"  123  \n  ") << '\n';
    std::cout << parseNum(L"  123 asd \n  ") << '\n';
}

prints

$ ./a.out 
123
0

(I've just returned 0 in the error case as something quick and easy for my example. You probably want to throw or something).

There are of course other options too. I just felt your assessment was unfair on stringstream. By the way, this is one of the few cases where you actually do want to check eof().

Edit: Ok, I added the ws and Ls to use wchar_ts.

Edit: Here's what the second if conceptually looks like expanded out. May help to understand why it is correct.

if ( iss >> std::ws )
{ // successfully read some (possibly none) whitespace
    if ( iss.eof() )
    { // and hit the end of the stream, so we know there was no garbage
        return parsed;
    }
    else
    { // something after the double that wasn't whitespace
        return 0;
    }
}
else
{ // something went wrong trying to read whitespace
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
wistringstream and wstring. Other than that, +1. –  dyp Sep 27 '13 at 13:19
    
What's the meaning of if ( !(iss >> parsed) ) check? operator>> returns istream&, not bool. Is istream convertible to bool? –  Violet Giraffe Sep 27 '13 at 13:31
    
@VioletGiraffe Roughly, yes, for exactly this purpose. In C++03, std::basic_ios had an operator void* which returned a null pointer if fail() returned true. As of 2011, it has an explicit operator bool, which behaves like this. Basically, it reads, and then checks that the read did not fail. –  BoBTFish Sep 27 '13 at 13:34
    
Note the same conversion happens further down as well, in iss >> std::ws && .... –  BoBTFish Sep 27 '13 at 13:41
    
I believe the condition is wrong here. Should be if (!(iss >> std::ws || iss.eof())), right? –  Violet Giraffe Oct 7 '13 at 7:59

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