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I have a couple of classes in my system

//this was not made an Interface for some WCF reasons
public abstract class BaseTransmission
{
    protected internal abstract string Transmit();

    //other common properties go here
}

And a few child classes like

public class EmailTransmission : BaseTransmission
    {
        //This property is added separately by each child class
        public EmailMetadata Metadata { get; set; }

        protected internal override string Transmit()
        {
            //verify email address or throw
            if (!Metadata.VerifyMetadata())
            {
                throw new Exception();
            }
        }
    }

Elsewhere, I have created a method with signature Transmit(BaseTransmission transmission). I am calling this method from another part of my code like this:

TransService svc = new TransService();
EmailTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission(); // this inherits from BaseTransmission
svc.Transmit(emailTrans);

This solves my purpose. But usually when I see examples of polymorphism, I always see that the reference type is base class type and it points to an instance of child class type. So usually in typical examples of polymorphism

EmailTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission();

will usually be

BaseTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission();

I cannot do this because EmailTransmission EmailMetadata is different from lets say FaxMetadata. So if I declare the reference to be of BaseTranmission type and point it to an instance of EmailTranmission type, I lose access to the EmailMetadata property of the EmailTransmission.

I want to know whether what I am doing above is a misuse of polymorphism and whether it 'breaks' polymorphism in some way. And if it is abusing polymorphism, whats the right way to do this.

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1  
Yeah, it looks good to me. The service itself works with the base class, so you should be fine. –  Jeff Sep 27 '13 at 14:52
2  
The reason you use a variable of type BaseTransmission is because the code doesn't care what the actual type is. That's typcically because it's only going to call methods of the BaseTransmission type. But, since you're calling a type specific method that is in one of the child classes, you have to use a variable of that type. There's nothing wrong with this code. –  Tony Vitabile Sep 27 '13 at 14:54
2  
The one thing that gets me is your comment "This property is added separately by each child class". So it sounds like all children of BaseTransmission will have a Metadata property. I wonder if in the ideal, you'd have an interface or base class for Metadata, and expose the accessors in BaseTransmission. It is perfectly fine as it is, though, and absolutely nothing is broken. –  Scott Mermelstein Sep 27 '13 at 14:58
3  
Some reason to not have a class Metadata as base for EmailMetadata and FaxMetadata? –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 27 '13 at 15:01
    
@AlessandroD'Andria I have a IMetadata interface that all Metadata classes implement, but all that is common among them is a method called VerifyMetadata(). Apart from that, the Metadata for Email is completely different from metadata for Fax. So they all have different properties that are added by each child class. Given that, what were you thinking can be done in that case? –  desigeek Sep 27 '13 at 15:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is perfectly valid. The polymorphic pattern is used in the TransService service Transmit method. It works with a class that can be morphed in one or more classes.

The fact that you declare the variable using the base class or the derived class is up to you and depends on your specific case.

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That should be completely fine. Within the transmit method the object is referenced as BaseTransmission, the "downcasting" is therefore less obvious. (had this as comment beforehand, but this should really be an answer)

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Well, this is perfetly valid case: as you use base class type like a base parameter in the TransService.Trasmit method.

The only thing which looks strange is:

protected internal abstract string Transmit();

do you really need protected and internal ? If yes, just skip this notion.

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Generally you would prefer using base type

BaseTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission();

This keeps you abstraction clean and helps you with Don't Repeat Yourself. This will be useful in the following scenario: suppose a user can select how she/he can be contacted (email, fax, text). When you need to send something you just have a single method that takes BaseTransmission object and parameters, say BaseParameter.

Note: if it looks, as if there is not much code can be shared, you can define an interface ITransmitter and use it to show that a class can send something, like:

ITransmitter transmitter = new EmailTransmission();
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What you are doing is absolutely correct and should work without issue. Passing a child class to a function/method that takes the base class should not be an issue.

However, regarding your example here:

This solves my purpose. But usually when I see examples of polymorphism, I always see that the reference type is base class type and it points to an instance of child class type. So usually in typical examples of polymorphism

EmailTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission();

will usually be

BaseTransmission emailTrans = new EmailTransmission();

This is done if BaseTransmission is an interface or abstract class and you then need to construct a specific version of BaseTransmission. Sometimes if you don't need the extra components some people like to use this to keep their code clean as well. The most common usage of this is seen with generics such as when you want to create a List for example, but need to implement a specific version os List such as ArrayList or LinkedList

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