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This is my first question so I apologize if I break rules, etc.

Essentially, I have a jagged array(Apples) containing objects(Worms). The main trouble I've come across is writing the elements of this array to the console window. I more or less don't understand how to properly index the array.

        object[][] Apples = new object[2][];   //This says that we will declare a jagged array of objects.  Our Apples array will contain 2 elements, each of which is a single dimensional array

        Apples[0] = new object[2]; //initializing the elements, saying element 0 of apples will be an object, in our case an array, with 2 element
        Apples[1] = new object[2]; //initializing the elements, saying element 1 of apples will be an object, in our case an array, with 2 elements

        Apples[0][0] = new Worm(22, "Matt"); //the first element in the array of worm in the first element of the array of apple
        Apples[0][1] = new Worm(23, "Marty");//the second element in the array of worm in the first element of the array of apple
        Apples[1][0] = new Worm(24, "Mike"); //the first element in the array of worm in the second element of the array of apple
        Apples[1][1] = new Worm(25, "Pete"); //the second element in the array of worm in the second element of the array of apple

        for (int i = 0; i < Apples.Length; i++)  //this is the only thing i'm having trouble with
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < Apples[i].LongLength; j++)
            {
                System.Console.WriteLine("Element[{0}][{1}]: ", i, j);
                System.Console.Write(Apples[i].ToString());
                System.Console.Write("\n\r");
            }
        }
        System.Console.WriteLine("\n\rPress any key to exit.");
        System.Console.ReadKey();

My worm class is as follows:

    public class Worm
{
    public Worm(int WormAge, string WormName) //constructor that accepts two arguments
    {
        int age = WormAge;
        string name = WormName;
    }
}
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This way? System.Console.Write(Apples[i][j].ToString()); –  Jeroen van Langen Sep 27 '13 at 14:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're referring to the Worm incorrectly, try using Apples[i][j] instead of Apples[i].

for (int i = 0; i < Apples.Length; i++)  //this is the only thing i'm having trouble with
{
    for (int j = 0; j < Apples[i].LongLength; j++)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Element[{0}][{1}]: ", i, j);
        System.Console.Write(Apples[i][j].ToString());
        System.Console.Write("\n\r");
    }
}

You may also need to override Worm.ToString() to get a more meaningful message for each Worm.

public class Worm
{
    // ...

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Worm '{0}', age {1}", name, age);
    }
}
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Doing it that way yields the following output: Element[0][0]: ConsoleApplication1.Worm Element[0][1]: ConsoleApplication1.Worm Element[1][0]: ConsoleApplication1.Worm Element[1][1]: ConsoleApplication1.Worm –  Matt44 Sep 27 '13 at 14:59
    
Yes that's right, I added an example of overriding the ToString() method, without your own implementation of ToString() it will just print the type (ConsoleApplication1.Worm). –  Daniel Imms Sep 27 '13 at 15:01
    
It's taken me forever to verify this(I haven't had a lot of time), but it worked fantastically. Thanks! –  Matt44 Oct 25 '13 at 20:10

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