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I declared an array of 10 elements and initialized it with 0.0 .. 9.9 , its output is perfect except 0.0 has been changed into 0, why is it so?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(void)
{
int const SIZE = 10;
double number[SIZE] = {0.0,1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5,6.6,7.7,8.8,9.9};
for(int i(0) ; i < SIZE ; i++)
{
        cout << number[i] << endl ;
}
system("PAUSE");
}

Thanks,

output: 0 //it should be 0.0 not 0// 1.1 2.2 . . . 9.9

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

std::cout by default will output up to 6 digits, which in this case is one (the zero) since no decimals are needed. std::cout << (double)1.0; would display 1, for instance. You can use std::setprecision from the <iomanip> header and std::fixed to keep the decimal.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
int main(void)
{
    int const SIZE = 10;
    double number[SIZE] = {0.0,1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5,6.6,7.7,8.8,9.9};
    std::cout << std::setprecision(1) << std::fixed;

    for(int i(0) ; i < SIZE ; i++)
    {
        std::cout << number[i] << std::endl ;
    }
}

There are lots of helpful i/o manipulators. Here's a reference to check it out.

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The default for inserting a double into cout or another stream is not to display as many digits as required to display the number. The default is C’s %g format, which uses six digits but removes trailing zeros (after rounding to six digits). –  Eric Postpischil Sep 27 '13 at 15:18
    
Edited, thanks for the clarification. –  Sam Cristall Sep 27 '13 at 17:14
    
That setpercision function was helpful in manipulating output of 1.1 till 9.9 but problem still there 0 is still zero even though i initialized 0th element to 0.0 !! –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 18:17
    
@ArsalaKamal Make sure you use fixed as well. setprecision sets the maximum number of digits rounding, fixed makes it so it will always display that number of decimals. Please read my answer carefully, and check the reference I link at the end. I have confirmed the output on my end to display 0.0 –  Sam Cristall Sep 27 '13 at 19:03

“0.0” and “0” are two numerals for the same number. A double stores only the number1; it does not store the original numeral.

When the source text of a C++ program contains a numeral such as 0.0 or 1.1, the compiler converts it from that numeral (which is a string of characters) to a double. The double format only represents numbers, not the strings they came from. So, a zero in double is just zero; it is not “0” or “0.0” or “0.000”. When you print it, there is no way for software that prints a double to know whether the original numeral was “0” or “0.0”. It just prints it according to the rules for printing a double.

By default, a double value of zero is printed as “0”. If you wish it to be printed differently, you can use I/O manipulators to ask that it be formatted differently. For example, after you #include <iomanip>, you can use std::cout << std::setprecision(1) << std::fixed; to set the floating-point output format to one digit in a fixed (versus scientific) format. Then printing a double value of zero will produce “0.0”.


1 Except, for zero, double can distinguish +0 and –0 (when IEEE 754 is used for floating-point).

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Could you explain a little bit more please? –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 18:43
    
@ArsalaKamal: I have added some more information. –  Eric Postpischil Sep 27 '13 at 18:59

That is simply how cout works by default. To change that, you can either:

  1. use the precision() method:

    cout.precision(1);
    for(int i(0) ; i < SIZE ; i++)
    {
        cout << number[i] << endl ;
    }
    
  2. Use setprecision():

    #include <iomanip>
    
    cout << setprecision(1) << fixed;
    for(int i(0) ; i < SIZE ; i++)
    {
        cout << number[i] << endl ;
    }
    
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Does precision() work without <iomanip>? –  nhgrif Sep 27 '13 at 15:11
2  
@nhgrif Yes it does. –  Sam Cristall Sep 27 '13 at 17:17
    
Good to know, thanks. –  nhgrif Sep 27 '13 at 17:17
    
That setpercision function was helpful in manipulating output of 1.1 till 9.9 but problem still there 0 is still zero even though i initialized 0th element to 0.0 !! –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 18:27
    
There's really no difference in initializing a double to 0 or 0.0, or 0.00, etc. In order to use setprecision, however, you have to #include <iomanip> with your other include statements. Otherwise, use cout.precision as Remy also demonstrated. –  nhgrif Sep 27 '13 at 18:43

If you really need to output 0.0 rather than 0, look into #include <iomanip>

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Yeah need to see –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 18:39

The normal format will use a representation a compact as possible in most cases. Since binary floating point numbers are normalized, they don't represent any trailing digits. If you want to have an extra fractional position, you might want to use these flags:

std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1);

The entire program would look like this:

#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int const SIZE = 10;
    double number[SIZE] = {0.0,1.1,2.2,3.3,4.4,5.5,6.6,7.7,8.8,9.9};
    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(1);
    for(int i(0) ; i != SIZE ; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << number[i] << '\n';
    }
    std::cin.ignore();
}
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Yeah i used what you said setprecision function but still have problem, please see edited version of my question including output. –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 18:39
    
@ArsalaKamal: I don't see any change in your original indicating that you used my suggestion. Also, using the suggestion clearly prints all values with one digits. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 27 '13 at 18:46
    
I did experiment on my IDE your suggestion is working fine with 1st element till last element of array, but problem is still there that is 0th element is still displaying 0 instead of 0.0 even i initialized it to 0.0 –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 19:06
    
@ArsalaKamal: If I ran the code as posted in my updated response, the first element certainly gets printed as 0.0 as it should: the C++ standard mandates the formatting as 0.0 and I'm not aware of any platform which doesn't do so. Which IDE are you using? I'm currently sitting in a room with pretty much all standard C++ library implementers (i.e., the C++ standardization committee meeting) and I could quickly verify if the used standard C++ library is, indeed, broken. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 27 '13 at 19:10
    
yeah It worked on my machine too –  Arsala Kamal Sep 27 '13 at 19:21

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