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I have the following Store Procedure:

GO

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[BK_NUMBER]
(@Category NUMERIC(38, 0)) 
WITH
EXECUTE AS CALLER
AS

DECLARE @RunningNumber Int
DECLARE @min Int
DECLARE @max Int
DECLARE @newRunningNumber Int

BEGIN

    SELECT @RunningNumber = RunningNumber
    FROM PARKMARKENNUMMER
    WHERE PARKMARKENTYP_ID = @Category


       UPDATE PARKMARKENNUMMER 
       SET RUNNINGNUMBER = @RunningNumber + 1
       WHERE PARKMARKENTYP_ID = @Category 

       SELECT @newRunningNumber = RunningNumber
       FROM PARKMARKENNUMMER 
       WHERE PARKMARKENTYP_ID = @Category 



RETURN @newRunningNumber;
End;

I try to get @newRunningNumber with that VB - Code:

 Dim sqlConnection As New SqlConnection(MSSQL_Helper.strConnectionBookit)
        Dim command As New SqlCommand("BK_NUMBER", sqlConnection)
        command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure
        command.Parameters.Add("@Category", SqlDbType.Int).Value = ID
        Dim returnParameter As SqlParameter = command.Parameters.Add("RetVal", SqlDbType.Int)
        returnParameter.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue
        sqlConnection.Open()
        command.ExecuteNonQuery()
        sqlConnection.Close()
        Dim returnValue As Integer = returnParameter.Value
        Return returnValue

But it returns always "0". What iam doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Did you execute your SP in SQL server for the category you are passing as parameter and verified that it is not returning 0? –  rs. Sep 27 '13 at 15:03
3  
Use an OUTPUT parameter, not a return value. Return value is for error/status codes, not for data! –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 27 '13 at 15:05
    
When you look in DB does RunningNumber in PARKMARKENNUMMER have a value? If null, the add would give null and perpetuate. –  asantaballa Sep 27 '13 at 15:06
    
Before someone else gets to it, I've edited your title to remove the in Vb.net - you generally shouldn't put tags in titles unless they need to be there for the title to make sense. –  zimdanen Sep 27 '13 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're not actually returning the value:

RETURN @newRunningNumber

However, as Aaron Bertrand said, you should either set it as an OUTPUT parameter or SELECT it back out.

OUTPUT:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[BK_NUMBER]
(
    @Category NUMERIC(38, 0),
    @newRunningNumber INT
)

Dim newRunningNumber As SqlParameter("@newRunningNumber", SqlDbType.Int)
newRunningNumber.Direction = ParameterDirection.Output
// execute
Dim returnValue As Integer = newRunningNumber.Value

SELECT:

SELECT @newRunningNumber AS NewRunningNumber

Dim returnValue As Integer = CType(command.ExecuteScalar(), Integer)
share|improve this answer

While I agree with the other posts, OUTPUT parameter is the way to go, most people dont realize that you can put more than a single line into your command text. Because you can, you can convert something a DBA did into something you can use, without changing your stored procedure. For example:

CMD.CommandText = "DECLARE @return_value int;EXEC   @return_value = [dbo].[BK_NUMBER] (@Category = " & ID & ";SELECT @return_value"
Dim Ret as int32 = CMD.ExecuteScalar

This is just an example of what you can do. You should of coarse use parameters to avoid injection and have proper error handling, etc etc...

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