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I wrote a sum-of-squares function to test if a number n could be written as the sum of two squares. My code is as follows:

(define (square x) (* x x))
(define (sum-of-squares n)
 (define (sum-of-squares-h k)
    (cond ((= k n) #f)
       ((= n (+ (square(floor(sqrt k)))(square(floor(sqrt(- n k))))))#t)
                (sum-of-squares-h (+ k 1))))
    (sum-of-squares-h 1))    

When I test things such as :

(sum-of-squares 1)
(sum-of-squares 2)
(sum-of-squares 4)
(sum-of-squares 8)
(sum-of-squares 10)

My output is:

#f
#t
2
2
#t

Where did I go wrong/ what can I do to fix this? I have seen other ways to go about doing this problem, but if someone could help me by using what I already have that would be great. I am not too familiar with the floor function so I may have used it incorrectly.

EDIT - code with a few tweaks

 (define (square x) (* x x))
  (define (sum-of-squares n)
   (define (sum-of-squares-h k)
     (cond ((= k n) #f)
           ((< n 4) #f)
           ((= n (+ (square(floor(sqrt k)))(square(floor(sqrt(- n k))))))#t)
                 (sum-of-squares-h (+ k 1))))
     (sum-of-squares-h 1))     
share|improve this question
    
I'm not familiar with the formula you're using to determine if a number if the sum of two squares, can you post a link to the source? –  Óscar López Sep 27 '13 at 15:10
    
I don't have a link... my logic may be flawed. How can I return "k" and "(-n k)" when sum-of-squares-h returns true to see if I am getting correct values? –  John Friedrich Sep 27 '13 at 15:22
    
In the code, put a (display (list k (- n k))) at the exact point before #t is being returned, so you can check the result. Or use a debugger ;) –  Óscar López Sep 27 '13 at 15:24
1  
It returns (4 4)#t for the test of 8 and (1 9)#t for the test of 10. This is just two examples, but the others work as well. Since 4 4 1 and 9 are all perfect squares this works as intended :D –  John Friedrich Sep 27 '13 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You forgot the else part in the last condition:

(define (sum-of-squares n)
  (define (sum-of-squares-h k)
    (cond ((= k n)
           #f)
          ((= n (+ (square (floor (sqrt k)))
                   (square (floor (sqrt (- n k))))))
           #t)
          (else
           (sum-of-squares-h (+ k 1)))))
  (sum-of-squares-h 1))
share|improve this answer

Here is my function that finds all the ways that a number n can be written as the sum of squares:

(define (squares n)
  (let loop ((x (isqrt n)) (y 0) (zs '()))
    (cond ((< x y) zs)
          ((< (+ (* x x) (* y y)) n) (loop x (+ y 1) zs))
          ((< n (+ (* x x) (* y y))) (loop (- x 1) y zs))
          (else (loop (- x 1) (+ y 1) (cons (list x y) zs))))))

The algorithm is from Dijkstra: x sweeps downward from the square root of n while y sweeps upward from zero; recursion stops when x and y cross. You can read more about it at my blog.

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