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I'm building a plugin that helps users signup and login from the WordPress front-end, and also hides and shows resources based on whether or not the user is logged in.

One area I've gotten stuck on is how to change the homepage that's shown at the root domain based on the user's logged-in/logged-out status. In a theme template, this is easily achieved using this structure:

if ( is_user_logged_in() ) {
    // Logged-in user content
} else {
    // Logged-out user content
}

Because this is a plugin, however, I don't want site admin to have to mess around with their theme files. So far I've tried adding this this to dynamically rewrite the front page:

if ( is_user_logged_in() ) {
  $about = get_page_by_title( 'Front Page Logged In' );
  update_option( 'page_on_front', $about->ID );
  update_option( 'show_on_front', 'page' );
} else {
  $about = get_page_by_title( 'Front Page Logged Out' );
  update_option( 'page_on_front', $about->ID );
  update_option( 'show_on_front', 'page' );
}

The update_option functions work on their own, but wrapped in an if statement, throw a fatal error so the site doesn't load at all.

I've also tried using the add_rewrite_rule API to simply tell WordPress to treat the root domain as another page. This works when specifying a particular page, but I can't figure out how to make it work for the root (and only root) URL, and even if I could, it also doesn't work properly when wrapped in an if statement.

function add_my_rule() {
    if ( is_user_logged_in ) {
        add_rewrite_rule('test','index.php?pagename=loggedin','top');
    } else {
      add_rewrite_rule('test','index.php?pagename=loggedout','top');
    }
}
add_action('init', 'add_my_rule');

So just to recap, I need a way to display one page as the front page if a user is logged in, and a different one if they're logged out, from a plugin (not from the theme files). Any insights into how to make this work would be great appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
What is the fatal error that gets returned when you wrap in the if statement? –  Jesse Kernaghan Sep 27 '13 at 16:33
    
On the latest WP release I'm not getting a fatal error, but I'm also not sure this is doing what you think it is. update_option() literally updates the WP Options table. In essence what your code tries to do will end up constantly changing the value for page_on_front and show_on_front each time a person logs in. –  Chris Rasco Sep 27 '13 at 16:58
    
Chris - thinking about this more, in what ways would the homepage differ if I was logged in/out? Is it a completely different page? Is that content static? –  Chris Rasco Sep 27 '13 at 17:03
    
@ChrisRasco - For a membership site or web app, I could imagine a landing page with call-to-action for logged out users, and a feed of content or what-have-you for internal folks. Kind of like how Facebook or Twitter work — it's the same URL whether or not you're logged in, but the content varies. –  Chris Ferdinandi Sep 27 '13 at 17:12
    
@JesseKernaghan - I'm not sure. Chrome returns a "Page failed to load" message, so it's not even printing an error messages. –  Chris Ferdinandi Sep 27 '13 at 17:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Approach One

This should do the trick based on template files. You would still need to have the user add/build the templates or copy them over to the theme directory upon plugin activation.

add_filter( 'template_include', 'member_home' );
function member_home( $template ) {
    if ( is_home() || is_front_page() ){
        if ( is_user_logged_in() ) {
            return locate_template('home-member.php');
        } else {
            return get_home_template();
        }
    }
    return $template;
}

Approach Two

Here is another approach, using only a plugin. This assumes you have a templates/ directory in your plugin folder which contains the file member-home.php.

It does two things:

  • changes the 'home' template for logged in users, looking for that template in the active theme directory, fallback to the plugin included version
  • replaces the_content with any data you want (pulled the 'Hello World' post in this example)

You could also add a new page via register_activation_hook() and query that data in the set_home_content() function.

define('MYPLUGIN_PLUGIN_PATH', plugin_dir_path( __FILE__ ));
define('ACTIVE_THEME_PATH', get_stylesheet_directory());

add_action('plugins_loaded', 'myplugin_plugins_loaded');

function set_home_template( $template ){
    if ( is_home() || is_front_page() ){
        if ( is_user_logged_in() ){
            if( file_exists(ACTIVE_THEME_PATH.'templates/member-home.php') ) {
                return ACTIVE_THEME_PATH.'templates/member-home.php';
            } else {
                return MYPLUGIN_PLUGIN_PATH.'templates/member-home.php';
            }
        } else {
            return get_home_template();
        }
    }
    // Returns the template
    return $template;
}

function set_home_content( $content ){
    if ( is_home() || is_front_page() ){
        if ( is_user_logged_in() ){
            $args = array(
                'pagename' => 'hello-world',
                'posts_per_page' => 1
            );
            $posts = new WP_Query( $args );
            while ( $posts->have_posts() ) {
                $posts->the_post();
                $content = get_the_content();
            }
            wp_reset_postdata();
            // Returns the custom queried content
            return $content;
        }
    }
    // Returns the default content.
    return $content;
}

function myplugin_plugins_loaded() {
     add_filter( 'template_include', 'set_home_template' );
     add_filter( 'the_content', 'set_home_content', 10 );
}

That should give you some ideas but as you noted, there is probably no real 'automatic' solution. The user will still have to adapt the theme files/add pages or whatsoever. But that could be part of a great plugin documentation ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach. This would take care of the layout, but not necessarily the content (depending on how the templates are structured). The more I look into this, the more it seems like I'd need to rely on the user to figure this part out on the theme side of things. Thanks though! –  Chris Ferdinandi Sep 28 '13 at 16:18
    
You're welcome. Updated my answer and added a 'plugin only' approach. That should give you some more ideas. Good luck! ;) –  Peter Harlacher Sep 29 '13 at 1:23
    
Thanks Peter. Not exactly what I was looking to do, but based on all of my research, this is the closest to my desired approach that I'll be getting. For production, I've opted to leave that up to the user. If you'd like to see the finished product, it's available here: github.com/cferdinandi/web-app-starter-kit –  Chris Ferdinandi Sep 29 '13 at 4:19
    
Starred & followed your repo. Thanks for the upvote! –  Peter Harlacher Sep 29 '13 at 4:31
    
And thank you for taking the time to help me out. Much appreciated! –  Chris Ferdinandi Sep 29 '13 at 23:23

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