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I have a long data frame that contains meteorological data from a mast. It contains observations (data$value) taken at the same time of different parameters (wind speed, direction, air temperature, etc., in data$param) at different heights (data$z)

I am trying to efficiently slice this data by $time, and then apply functions to all of the data collected. Usually functions are applied to a single $param at a time (i.e. I apply different functions to wind speed than I do to air temperature).

Current approach

My current method is to use data.frame and ddply.

If I want to get all of the wind speed data, I run this:

# find good data ----
df <- data[((data$param == "wind speed") &
                  !is.na(data$value)),]

I then run my function on df using ddply():

df.tav <- ddply(df,
               .(time),
               function(x) {
                      y <-data.frame(V1 = sum(x$value) + sum(x$z),
                                     V2 = sum(x$value) / sum(x$z))
                      return(y)
                    })

Usually V1 and V2 are calls to other functions. These are just examples. I do need to run multiple functions on the same data though.

Question

My current approach is very slow. I have not benchmarked it, but it's slow enough I can go get a coffee and come back before a year's worth of data has been processed.

I have order(hundred) towers to process, each with a year of data and 10-12 heights and so I am looking for something faster.

Data sample

data <-  structure(list(time = structure(c(1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 1262304600, 
1262305200, 1262305200, 1262305200, 1262305200, 1262305200, 1262305200, 
1262305200), class = c("POSIXct", "POSIXt"), tzone = ""), z = c(0, 
0, 0, 100, 100, 100, 120, 120, 120, 140, 140, 140, 160, 160, 
160, 180, 180, 180, 200, 200, 200, 40, 40, 40, 50, 50, 50, 60, 
60, 60, 80, 80, 80, 0, 0, 0, 100, 100, 100, 120), param = c("temperature", 
"humidity", "barometric pressure", "wind direction", "turbulence", 
"wind speed", "wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", 
"turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", 
"wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", 
"turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", 
"wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", 
"turbulence", "wind speed", "wind direction", "turbulence", "wind speed", 
"temperature", "barometric pressure", "humidity", "wind direction", 
"wind speed", "turbulence", "wind direction"), value = c(-2.5, 
41, 816.9, 248.4, 0.11, 4.63, 249.8, 0.28, 4.37, 255.5, 0.32, 
4.35, 252.4, 0.77, 5.08, 248.4, 0.65, 3.88, 313, 0.94, 6.35, 
250.9, 0.1, 4.75, 253.3, 0.11, 4.68, 255.8, 0.1, 4.78, 254.9, 
0.11, 4.7, -3.3, 816.9, 42, 253.2, 2.18, 0.27, 229.5)), .Names = c("time", 
"z", "param", "value"), row.names = c(NA, 40L), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question
    
Why not use .(param, time) instead of .(time)? You can remove NAs at once using data[!is.na(data$value),]. –  Ferdinand.kraft Sep 27 '13 at 15:42
    
I don't want to apply the same function to all of the data. In this case I'd just apply something to the wind speed data. –  Andy Clifton Sep 27 '13 at 15:45
    
Make your function read the param column and act accordingly. –  Ferdinand.kraft Sep 27 '13 at 15:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use data.table:

library(data.table)
dt = data.table(data)

setkey(dt, param)  # sort by param to look it up fast

dt[J('wind speed')][!is.na(value),
                    list(sum(value) + sum(z), sum(value)/sum(z)),
                    by = time]
#                  time      V1         V2
#1: 2009-12-31 18:10:00 1177.57 0.04209735
#2: 2009-12-31 18:20:00  102.18 0.02180000

If you want to apply a different function for each param, here's a more uniform approach for that.

# make dt smaller because I'm lazy
dt = dt[param %in% c('wind direction', 'wind speed')]

# now let's start - create another data.table
# that will have param and corresponding function
fns = data.table(p = c('wind direction', 'wind speed'),
                 fn = c(quote(sum(value) + sum(z)), quote(sum(value) / sum(z))),
                 key = 'p')
fns
                p     fn
1: wind direction <call>    # the fn column contains functions
2:     wind speed <call>    # i.e. this is getting fancy!

# now we can evaluate different functions for different params,
# sliced by param and time
dt[!is.na(value), {param; eval(fns[J(param)]$fn[[1]], .SD)},
   by = list(param, time)]
#            param                time           V1
#1: wind direction 2009-12-31 18:10:00 3.712400e+03
#2: wind direction 2009-12-31 18:20:00 7.027000e+02
#3:     wind speed 2009-12-31 18:10:00 4.209735e-02
#4:     wind speed 2009-12-31 18:20:00 2.180000e-02

P.S. I think the fact that I have to use param in some way before eval for eval to work is a bug.


UPDATE: As of version 1.8.11 this bug has been fixed and the following works:

dt[!is.na(value), eval(fns[J(param)]$fn[[1]], .SD), by = list(param, time)]
share|improve this answer
    
How would this work if the functions were not sum(), but instead I need to pass in value and z - e.g. myFunction(value,z)? Do I just put that call in the list()? –  Andy Clifton Sep 27 '13 at 15:58
    
@AndyClifton just write myFunction(value, z)? –  eddi Sep 27 '13 at 16:02
2  
The second approach is interesting but at the limits of readability (for me). I've gone with the first, using list(V1 = myFunction1(value,z), V2 = myFunction2(value,z)). Speed up is about a factor 100. –  Andy Clifton Sep 27 '13 at 17:08

Use dplyr. It's still in development, but it's much much faster than plyr:

# devtools::install_github(dplyr)
library(dplyr)

windspeed <- subset(data, param == "wind speed")
daily <- group_by(windspeed, time)

summarise(daily, V1 = sum(value) + sum(z), V2 = sum(value) / sum(z))

The other advantage of dplyr is that you can use a data table as a backend, without having to know anything about data.table's special syntax:

library(data.table)
daily_dt <- group_by(data.table(windspeed), time)
summarise(daily_dt, V1 = sum(value) + sum(z), V2 = sum(value) / sum(z))

(dplyr with a data frame is 20-100x faster than plyr, and dplyr with a data.table is about another 10x faster). dplyr is nowhere near as concise as data.table, but it has a function for each major task of data analysis, which I find makes the code easier to understand - you speed almost be able to read a sequence of dplyr operations to someone else and have them understand what's going on.

If you want to do different summaries per variable, I recommend changing your data structure to be "tidy":

library(reshape2)
data_tidy <- dcast(data, ... ~ param)

daily_tidy <- group_by(data_tidy, time)
summarise(daily_tidy, 
  mean.pressure = mean(`barometric pressure`, na.rm = TRUE),
  sd.turbulence = sd(`barometric pressure`, na.rm = TRUE)
)
share|improve this answer
1  
Hi @hadley. What are the 11+ functions you tweeted about, and the major tasks exactly that you map to, mentioned here? I looked on dplyr homepage and saw 5: select(), filter(), mutate(), summarise() and arrange(). When I look at group_by(data.table(windspeed), time) I find it confusing because there's no aggregate there. Does group_by split the data? Or does it set the key maybe? –  Matt Dowle Sep 28 '13 at 15:12
3  
Btw, to read out loud a data.table query you say "from DT subset i then do j grouped by by". It's really only 3 simple arguments : DT[i,j,by]. It might be easier for SQL folk to click with. –  Matt Dowle Sep 28 '13 at 15:23
    
@MatthewDowle group_by is conceptually similar to setting the key - you're describing that you want do the analysis "by" a group (it's translated to GROUP BY with an sql backend). The other verbs are group by, and the (currently) four joins. –  hadley Sep 28 '13 at 18:49
    
@MatthewDowle I find it hard to apply your reading suggestion to the examples in the other answer, esp. with the eval etc. I also find it hard to determine the correct data table syntax because actions behave different inside and outside of [. –  hadley Sep 28 '13 at 18:50
4  
You're not being fair here. That part of @eddi's answer is complicated because he's keeping the data wide and demonstrating stretching data.table; e.g., he created a data.table that contains functions and looks them up for goodness sake. You're not comparing like with like. Btw, don't you need to deal with NA in the subset or add na.rm to each of the sum calls? –  Matt Dowle Sep 28 '13 at 20:16

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