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I'm trying to make a game of rock, paper, scissors in Python and I think I almost have it, but my code isn't giving me anything back. I was hoping maybe someone here could help me out. My code will start with no issues and it gets input from the user, but once the user puts something in it just does all the comparing behind the scenes and doesn't give back a statement. Can anyone help? (This is also an assignment for my Computer Science class so my teacher was being corny and wanted us to run it as Python, Ruby, Java)

    def pythonRubyJava():
        Python=1
        Ruby=2
        Java=3
        mylist3=[1,2,3]
        cpu=random.choice(mylist3)
        player1=input("Python, Ruby, or Java? ")
        if (cpu == Python) and (player1 == Python):
            print("The computer chose Python and you chose Python")
            print("You tied.")
        elif (cpu == Python) and (player1 == Ruby):
            print("The computer chose Python and you chose Ruby")
            print("You lost.")
        elif (cpu == Python) and (player1 == Java):
            print("The computer chose Python and you chose Java")
            print("You won!")
       elif (cpu == Ruby) and (player1 == Ruby):
            print("The computer chose Ruby and you chose Ruby")
            print("You tied.")
       elif (cpu == Ruby) and (player1 == Python):
            print("The computer chose Ruby and you chose Python")
            print("You won!")
       elif (cpu == Ruby) and (player1 == Java):
            print("The computer chose Ruby and you chose Java")
            print("you lost.")
       elif (cpu == Java) and (player1 == Java):
            print("The computer chose Java and you chose Java")
            print("You tied.")
       elif (cpu == Java) and (player1 == Python):
            print("The computer chose Java and you chose Python")
            print("You lost.")
       elif (cpu == Java) and (player1 == Ruby):
            print("The computer chose Java and you chose Ruby")
            print("You won!")
       while (player1 == Python,Ruby,Java):
            print(pythonRubyJava())
share|improve this question
    
Downvote for "Python 4" –  Andreas Jung Sep 27 '13 at 15:52
    
Liar! Got me a bit excited about Python 4000 –  Alix Axel Sep 27 '13 at 15:53
    
@user2799617 Has been corrected, so downvote is obsolete. –  glglgl Sep 27 '13 at 15:54
1  
Skewed game... Java would always win :) –  Walls Sep 27 '13 at 15:54
    
Downvote remains in place for various reasons. –  Andreas Jung Sep 27 '13 at 15:56
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3 Answers

For one, your user input returns a string of either "Python", "Ruby", or "Java". Doing the comparisons, you are comparing strings to ints, so "Python" == Python will never be true because "Python" != 1.

Additionally, you want to avoid calling the function from within the function recursively like that. Put the while loop outside with a different truth condition. Transfer the error checking inside the function.

Also, your code might be much more readable if you just

  • Leave the user and cpu selections as strings
  • Test if cpu.lower() == player1.strip().lower()
  • If true, print("Computer chose {} and you chose {}".format(cpu)) with "you won!"
  • If false, print the same thing with "you lost!"
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1) Move the while loop out of the function. 2) Maybe try assigning values to the choices and comparing the "weight" of each of them, so you "don't repeat yourself"

Something in the lines of:

class Language:
    def __init__(self, name, weight, choice_number)
        self.name, self.weight, self.choice_number = name, weight, choice_number

available_choices = [Language('python, 3, 1'), Language('ruby', 2, 2),
                     Language('java', 1, 3)]

Then, you can compare the weight (searching by name) and print the proper names. Also, this is Python 3, not 4

AND IF THE PC CHOOSES JAVA AND YOU CHOOSE PYTHON, YOU WIN! xD

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Since this is a programming assignment, I'm not going to point to the exact solution. However, you seem to be missing some indentation issues.

After defining the function (def pythonRubyJava():) who is going to run it? The last two lines of your function make a recursive call inside the function definition, inside a while.

In short, you are not seeing anything back because no code is running at the moment (the function is defined, yes, but never called).

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